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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 3: early's brigade at Manassas. (search)
he side of the hill. As we advanced the enemy disappeared behind the crest, and while we were ascending the slope Lieutenant McDonald, acting aide to Colonel Elzey, came riding rapidly towards me and requested me not to let my men fire on the troophave, but it is a mistake, I recognize Colonel Hill of the 13th, and his horse. This was a mistake on the part of Lieutenant McDonald, arising from a fancied resemblance of a mounted officer with the enemy to the Colonel of the 13th. This regiment did not reach the battlefield at all. This information and the positive assurance of Lieutenant McDonald, however, caused me to halt my troops and ride to the crest of the ridge, where I observed a regiment about two hundred yards to my right dretire rapidly, when I saw the United States flag unfurled and discovered the mistake into which I had been led by Lieutenant McDonald. I immediately ordered my command forward and it advanced to the crest of the hill. All this occurred in less
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
191, 194, 195, 197, 199 Massie, Captain, 433 Matadaquean, 363, 364 Matapony, 357 Matthews' House, 26, 27, 334, 339 Mayo, Colonel, 356 McCausland, General, 374-75-76, 378, 381, 383, 385-86-87, 389, 391, 396, 401-02, 404, 407, 409- 10, 416, 423, 434, 453, 454, 456, 466 McClanahan's Battery, 333-34-35 McClellan, General (U. S. A.), 44, 48, 50, 51, 54, 58, 64, 66, 72, 74, 75, 85, 87-92, 104, 105, 114, 131-32- 33, 140, 148, 150, 154-159, 161, 163-64-65, 361, 404 McDonald, Lieutenant (A. A. G.), 24, 25 McDowell, 326 McDowell, General (U. S. A.), 2, 10, 13, 28, 31, 33, 36, 38-42, 44, 46, 48, 74, 75, 92, 103, 119, 122 McGowan's Brigade, 355 McGuire, Surgeon H., 215, 217, 464, 473, 476 McLaws, General, 60, 76, 132-33, 135- 36-37, 147, 149, 152, 154-55, 158, 163, 194-95, 197, 211-12, 216, 218, 220, 225-26-27, 230-31, 233, 236, 342 McLean's Farm, 6, 12, 16 McLean's Ford, 5, 15, 17, 18, 20, 31, 52, 53 McLean's House, 6, 7, 10, 16 McNeil, Captai
The Atlanta (Georgia) Campaign: May 1 - September 8, 1864., Part I: General Report. (ed. Maj. George B. Davis, Mr. Leslie J. Perry, Mr. Joseph W. Kirkley), chapter 128 (search)
companies should swing to the right across the front of these regiments and take a battery, and then swing back again that distance to the left and the rebels to retake it before my front line reached the works, is difficult to understand. The flag claimed to have been taken is a misstatement. This flag was taken by an officer from the parapet long after the works had been carried and when my command was actually turning the works with pick and spade by my order. This can be proven by Major McDonald and many others of the Sixtieth Illinois. In my report I said nothing about the formal surrender of Major Lee and officers and men of the Sixth Kentucky to Captain Dunphy, of the Tenth Michigan Infantry, and turned over by him to a provost-marshal of the Third Division, being desirous that all should participate in the credit of this most successful charge; neither did I think it necessary to report that all of Colonel Este's command, that had carried the enemy's works previous to my s
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 7: the siege of Charleston to the close of 1863.--operations in Missouri, Arkansas, and Texas. (search)
errell, whom General Fitz-Henry Warren had ordered to Springfield. After a skirmish, the Unionists were flanked, and Marmaduke's whole force pushed on toward Hartsville. But Merrell was there before him, re-enforced by the Ninety-ninth Illinois, and portions of the Third Iowa and Third Missouri Cavalry, supported by a battery commanded by Lieutenant Wald Schmidt. A sharp engagement ensued, when Marmaduke was repulsed, with a loss of about three hundred men, including a brigadier-general (McDonald) and three colonels, killed. Merrell's loss was seventy-one men, seven of them killed. His ammunition was running low, so he fell back on Lebanon, while Marmaduke, having no spirit for further fighting in Missouri, fled swiftly southward that night, and escaped into Arkansas. With a part of his force he took post at Batesville, on the White River, where he was attacked Feb. 4. by the Fourth Missouri Cavalry, Colonel G. E. Waring, and driven across the stream, with the loss of a colonel
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War, Chapter 4 (search)
en in the northern part of his district, across the Potomac. Their number being inconsiderable, he succeeded in ten days, without serious fighting. His men suffered very much, however, from cold, and hard marches. In the distribution of the troops of the district, agreed upon by General Jackson and myself, General Loring's three brigades were stationed near Romney, General Meem's brigade of militia at Martinsburg, General Carson's at Bath, and the militia regiments of Colonels Monroe, McDonald, Harness, and Johnson, occupied Moorfield, and different points on a curved line thence, in advance of Romney, to Bath. A week or two after these dispositions were completed, General Jackson received the following order from Mr. Benjamin, acting Secretary of War: Our news indicates that a movement is being made to cut off General Loring's command. Order him back to Winchester immediately. After I had received from General Jackson information of this singular interference, it seemed t
William Tecumseh Sherman, Memoirs of General William T. Sherman ., volume 1, chapter 13 (search)
arge of such as have been leased out by disloyal owners. I understand that General Grant takes the rents and profits of this class of real property under the rules and laws of war, and not under the confiscation act of Congress; therefore the question of title is not involved-simply the possession, and the rents and profits of houses belonging to our enemies, which are not vacant, we hold in trust for them or the Government, according to the future decisions of the proper tribunals. Mr. McDonald, your chief agent in renting and managing this business, called on me last evening and left with me written questions, which it would take a volume to answer and a Webster to elucidate; but as we can only attempt plain, substantial justice, I will answer these questions as well as I can, briefly and to the point: First. When ground is owned by parties who have gone south, and have leased the ground to parties now in the city who own the improvements on the ground? Answer. The United
on the twenty-ninth ult. In the death of Colonel Cantwell the country, as well as his family, have sustained an irreparable loss. No braver man or truer patriot ever lived. He constantly studied the best interests of the service and of his soldiers, and they obeyed, loved and respected him as a father. Truly the loss of such an officer in these trying times is a great calamity. I avail myself of this opportunity to return my thanks to the members of my staff--Captains Baird, Flesher, McDonald, and Lieutenants Cravens and Hopper, for their promptness, bravery, and efficiency in the transmission and execution of orders. Captain Baird, unfortunately, in attempting to return to me on the field, on the evening of the thirtieth ult., after dark, in company with one of my orderlies, (Corporal Wilson, of the First Virginia cavalry,) took a wrong path which led them into the enemy's lines, and they were both captured, and are still prisoners. My Brigade-Surgeon, too, Major Daniel Meeke
on the twenty-ninth ult. In the death of Colonel Cantwell the country, as well as his family, have sustained an irreparable loss. No braver man or truer patriot ever lived. He constantly studied the best interests of the service and of his soldiers, and they obeyed, loved and respected him as a father. Truly the loss of such an officer in these trying times is a great calamity. I avail myself of this opportunity to return my thanks to the members of my staff--Captains Baird, Flesher, McDonald, and Lieutenants Cravens and Hopper, for their promptness, bravery, and efficiency in the transmission and execution of orders. Captain Baird, unfortunately, in attempting to return to me on the field, on the evening of the thirtieth ult., after dark, in company with one of my orderlies, (Corporal Wilson, of the First Virginia cavalry,) took a wrong path which led them into the enemy's lines, and they were both captured, and are still prisoners. My Brigade-Surgeon, too, Major Daniel Meeke
Washington, D. C., April 18.--One year ago, about seven o'clock in the evening, an extra train arrived at the Washington depot, containing the following military companies, being the first that had reached the Federal city, to protect it against the attack threatened by the secessionists after the fall of Fort Sumter: The Washington light artillery, of Pottsville, Pennsylvania, one hundred and twenty-six men, commanded by Capt. McDonald. The Ringgold flying artillery, of Reading, Pennsylvania, one hundred and five men, commanded by Capt. McKnight. The Logan Guard, of Lewistown, Pennsylvania, eighty-six men, commanded by Capt. Selheimer. The Allen infantry, of Allen, Pennsylvania, fifty men, commanded by Capt. Yeager. Company F, Fourth artillery, Major Pemberton, sixty men, from Fort Ridgely, Minnesota. It will be observed that all these troops were Pennsylvanians, with the exception of a single artillery company of regulars. They passed through Baltimore amid the
had--   Charles, b. Aug. 21, 1728.   Anna, b. Dec. 29, 1731.   Charles Willis, jun., m. Abigail Belknap, gr.-dau. of Rev. John Bailey, of Watertown, and had--   Charles.   Nathaniel, b. 1760; d. 1832.   Abigail, m. Isaac Collins.   Of these,--   Nathaniel Willis m. Lucy Douglass, of New London, and had--   Andrew, d. young.   Nathaniel, b. June 6, 1780.   Rebecca, b. 1782; m. Samuel Richards.   He m., 2d, Mary Cartmell, and had--   Sarah, m. Judge Easton, of La.   Mary, m.----McDonald.   Eliza, m. D. R. Ferguson.   Catharine, m.----Carpenter.   Madeline, m. Hiram Still.   James M.   Henry C.   Matilda.   Julian D., deceased.   The oldest son, Nathaniel, is the well-known publisher in Boston. He m., July 22, 1803, Hannah Parker, who was b. Jan. 28, 1782, and d. Mar. 21, 1844. Their children were--   Lucy D., b. May 11, 1804; m. J. F. Bumstead.    Nathaniel Parker, the well-known author, b. Jan. 20, 1806; m.1st, Oct.
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