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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 9 1 Browse Search
Emilio, Luis F., History of the Fifty-Fourth Regiment of Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry , 1863-1865 4 0 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 3 1 Browse Search
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course, until whiz! whiz! came the little pieces like grape-shot. Charleston papers gave us information that yellow fever was prevalent and increasing, not only among the prisoners, but the citizens, and especially the Germans. At the stockade the captives gave no trouble, and readily conformed to the rules. The wardens took great pride in their office. At roll-calls they accurately dressed the lines, and doubtless imparted some useful hints to the Confederate officers. From Major McDonald, Fifty-first North Carolina, who was present in Wagner during the assault of July 18, 1863, very interesting particulars of the affair were obtained. He confirmed the story of Colonel Shaw's death and manner of burial. After a few days' experience the prisoners lost all fear of being struck by stray shells thrown by their friends; but they watched the bombardment always with interest, so far as they were able. When Wagner opened, the heavy Parrott projectiles passed directly over th
55,160,178, 183. Fifty-Fifth, 11, 22, 24, 37, 108, 122, 125, 136, 142, 143, 158, 171, 176, 184, 185, 191, 200, 213, 230, 236, 241, 243, 244, 251, 255, 257, 260, 272, 274, 275, 295, 315. Material of regiment, 21. Matthews, E. O., 250. May, John J., 16. May, Miss, Abby, 23. May, Mrs., 16. May, Samuel, 16, 24. Mayflower, steamer, 46, 61, 257. Maysville, S. C., 295. McAllister, Fort, 261. McClellansville, S. C., 314. McCullar, Thomas, 304. McDermott, William, 315, 317. McDonald, J. R., 226. McDonough, gunboat, 52, 201. McGirt's Creek, Fla., 174, 178. McGuire, P., 121. McKay, George F., 260. McLaws, Lafayette, 267, 272, 275. Medal of Honor, 134. Merceraux, Thomas J., 256. Metcalf, Henry, 161. Michie, P. S., 109, 118. Middleton Depot, S. C., 306. Military Situation, close 1862, 1. Mill Branch, S. C., 293. Miller, Andrew, 301. Milton, Governor, steamer, 52. Mingoe, gunboat, 237. Mitchel, John C., 190, 218. Mitchell, Charles L., 243. Mitchell,
t a hundred or more of his most determined followers effected a lodgment, and for more than an hour held their place inside the fort, although their comrades had been repulsed. General Taliaferro called for volunteers to dislodge Putnam. Maj. J. R. McDonald of the Fifty-first North Carolina, and Captain Ryan of the Charleston battalion, both offered their services. Ryan's company was accepted, but failed. Whenever, however, any of Putnam's men showed themselves, the Fifty-first North Caroliregiment, the Fifty-first North Carolina troops, redeemed the reputation of the Thirty-first. They gallantly sought their position, under a heavy shelling, and maintained it during the action. Colonel McKethan, Lieutenant-Colonel Hobson and Major McDonald are the field officers of this regiment and deserve special mention. The Confederate loss in this battle was only 18; the Federal, 1,515. Official Reports, Rebellion Records. The two direct assaults upon Wagner having failed, the Fede
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 14: (search)
and directed the field pieces on the left of the fort outside the sally-port to direct their fire to the right, so as to sweep the ditch and exterior slope of that part of the work thus occupied, thus preventing the escape or reinforcement of the enemy at that point. The main body of the enemy, after a vain attempt to pass over our field of fire, retreated under the fire of our artillery and the shells of Fort Sumter. Calling for volunteers to dislodge the force in the salient, Maj. J. R. McDonald, Fifty-first North Carolina, and Captain Ryan, Charleston battalion, promptly responded, with their men. Ryan was selected and ordered to charge the salient. Instantly leading his men forward, he was killed in front of them, and this caused his command to hesitate and lose the opportunity. Fighting bravely, the Connecticut men and those of Putnam's brigade clung to the parapet and the interior of the salient, and suffered from the fire of the Fifty-first North Carolina whenever they
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 16: (search)
use was opposite Reed's bridge, and south of it, on the road, were the houses of Poe, Brotherton, Brock, Taylor and Vineyard. Nearly a mile north of Kelly's was McDonald's. From McDonald's to Lee & Gordon's mills (the road running nearly north and south) was about 4 miles. The crossings of the Chickamauga were by fords and twoMcDonald's to Lee & Gordon's mills (the road running nearly north and south) was about 4 miles. The crossings of the Chickamauga were by fords and two bridges, Alexander's and Reed's; the former opposite Vineyard's house, and the latter opposite Kelly's. Hunt's (or Dalton's) ford came nearest Lee & Gordon's mills; then Thedford's, then Alexander's bridge, then Byram's ford, then Reed's bridge, and a mile further north, Reed's ford. General Bragg's order designated the ford or bGeneral Polk and his left to Lieutenant-General Longstreet; the latter did not arrive until II p. m. on the 19th. Forrest was well out on the right, in front of McDonald's; Wheeler on the left, at Lee & Gordon's mills and beyond. Polk's command was arranged from right to left, as follows: Breckinridge, Cleburne, with Walker behi
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
trustees of the Cooper-Limestone institute of Limestone, S. C., and is one of the directors of Converse college. He was the leading spirit in the building of the Spartanburg mill, of which he is president and treasurer, and he is also a director of the Whitney & Lockhart mills. James Washington Moore, an attorney of Hampton county, S. C., came of a distinguished ancestry. He traces his genealogy back, by name and date (see Dr. Smith's History of Peterboro, N. H.) to the Moores of clan McDonald, a number of the family having been killed in the massacre of Glencoe. One of his American ancestors was Col. Andrew Todd, so famous in colonial history, and also an officer of his own name, who was in the French war. At the battle of Bunker Hill Lieutenant Moore was conspicuous, and Gen. James Miller, the hero of Chippewa, intermarried with the family. On the maternal side General Moore is a grandnephew of Hon. Levi Woodbury, of New Hampshire, who was successively governor of New Hampshi