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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan organizing the grand Army. (search)
find again in his front but a year later,--the successes of Laurel Hill and Rich Mountain, gave evidence of what might be expected of the inexperienced troops placed in McClellan's hands. See McClellan in West Virginia, by General J. D. Cox, Vol. I., p. 126.--Editors. He had already shown rare strategic ability, and the President had confided to him the task of creating the Army of the Potomac from the disorganized bands who had fallen back on Washington under the brave and unfortunate McDowell. Surrounded for the most part by young officers, he was himself the most youthful of us all, not only by reason of his physical vigor, the vivacity of his impressions, the noble candor of his character, and his glowing patriotism, but also, I may add, by his inexperience of men. His military bearing breathed a spirit of frankness, benevolence, and firmness. His look was piercing, his voice gentle, his temper equable, his word of command clear and definite. His encouragement was most affe
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
al officers to their command. First Corps, McDowell — Divisions: Franklin, McCall, and King; Secothe Department of the Rappahannock, under General McDowell, the latter including Washington. I thus advance down the Shenandoah, the movement of McDowell was suspended. Next day the President again nd in position to reenforce Jackson or oppose McDowell, whose advance was then eight miles south of e of the assurance that I should be joined by McDowell's corps. As it was now clear that I could not bank. As the expectation of the advance of McDowell was still held out, and that only by the landpaid to the simplest principle of war to push McDowell rapidly on Jackson's heels, when he made his at it was intended to send the residue of General McDowell's force to join me as speedily as possibl the Secretary telegraphed that the forces of McDowell, Banks, and Fremont would be consolidated as ope of success; and, as I was still told that McDowell would arrive by the overland route, I could n[9 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Manassas to Seven Pines. (search)
4000 effective were, in fact, Anderson's division sent to observe McDowell's corps at Fredericksburg, and so large that General Lee called itetween his left and the right, which was beyond the Chickahominy. McDowell's corps of 40,000 men McDowell says, May 22d, 1862, Official ReMcDowell says, May 22d, 1862, Official Records, Vol. XII., Part III., p. 214, that he would require subsistence for 38,000 men. This included both effectives and non-effectives. A fair deduction would leave McDowell about 35,000 combatants, to compute by the basis on which the Confederate generals always estimated their sn sent word that his scouts left near Fredericksburg reported that McDowell's troops were marching southward. As the object of this march was corps with the main army, I determined to attack McClellan before McDowell could join him; and the major-generals were desired to hold their al J. E. B. Stuart, who also had a detachment of cavalry observing McDowell's corps, reported that it had returned to Fredericksburg. As my o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
nston, stating he had just been informed that McDowell was advancing from Fredericksburg in force. bout 40,000 men; About 35,000 effectives. McDowell asked for subsistence for 38,000 men, includi00,000, and we could not afford to wait until McDowell reached him. General Johnston determined to attack the Federal right before McDowell could come up. I was ordered to move my division to the er, by the necessity for prompt action before McDowell could join McClellan. I did not know, in anycClellan, and, if possible, defeat him before McDowell could arrive. On receiving my report Genernston said that it was not quite certain that McDowell had moved north the disposition made of our troops whilst it was supposed McDowell was coming was too strong on the left to admit of immediate anut it was distinctly understood that, in case McDowell did not promptly come on, General Johnston woey were assigned when it was first heard that McDowell was Major-General Erasmus D. Keyes. From a[2 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The navy in the Peninsular campaign. (search)
they were going there beyond this. On the 14th of March, Secretary Welles wrote to Secretary Stanton regarding McClellan's call for naval assistance: If a movement is to be made upon Norfolk, always a favorite measure of this Department, instant measures will be taken to advise and strengthen Flag-Officer Goldsborough; but unless such be the case, I should be extremely reluctant to take any measure that would even temporarily weaken the efficiency of the blockade. On the 17th Gen. McDowell wrote to McClellan: In connection with General Barnard I have had a long conference with Assistant Secretary Fox, as to naval cooperation. He promises all the power of the Department shall be at our disposal. Editors. General McClellan arrived at Old Point on the 2d of April, and immediately communicated with Flag-Officer Goldsborough. The advance of the army was to begin at once. Notwithstanding that he had previously considered it an essential part of his plan that Yorktown
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 6.33 (search)
regions winter still lingered, and had made his way through snows and rains to McDowell, ten miles east of Monterey, at the crossing of Bull Pasture River, where he ng upon Fremont for help, Schenck was sent forward to support him, who reached McDowell, having marched 34 miles in 24 hours. Jackson had not fully concentrated his fhenck in his report says: A little observation served to show at once that McDowell, as a defensive position, was entirely untenable, and especially against the lough the narrow gorge, which afforded the only egress from the valley in which McDowell is situated, in the direction of Franklin. Editors. in which their casualtiesg that Fremont had concentrated his forces, he did not attack, but returned to McDowell, whence he took the direct road to Harrisonburg, and marched to attack Banks ae abandoned. A month passed in efforts to destroy Jackson by concentration of McDowell's, Banks's, and Fremont's troops; but it was too late to remedy the ill effect
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Stonewall Jackson in the Shenandoah. (search)
t Staunton; he fought Milroy and Schenck near McDowell on May 8th; Banks at Front Royal, Newtown, anon's ability to hold back Fremont, Banks, and McDowell long enough to let Johnston try doubtful conct in motion they took the road leading toward McDowell, the general having sent forward cavalry to Ball avenues of approach from the direction of McDowell or Staunton till relieved of this duty. Jacknt Davis from Staunton, the nearest office to McDowell. He took a seat at a table and wrote nearly he courier with this reply, as I supposed, to McDowell, but, lo! it met Jackson only twelve miles fd in blissful ignorance that Jackson had left McDowell, till he learned by telegraph some days later. Ashby's men were still in his front toward McDowell, with an unknown force; so Fremont did not athed from Staunton to McDowell, 40 miles, from McDowell to Front Royal, about 110, from Front Royal there, and the Government was afraid to permit McDowell to unite his forces with McClellan's lest it [6 more...]
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Notes on the battle of McDowell. (search)
those of my immediate command who were least fatigued. The whole number engaged was 2600; of these we had just ten per cent. killed and wounded. We remained at McDowell, at the foot of the mountain, the point from which our troops moved to the attack through that night, buried our dead, sent off the wounded and all stores, and wre than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 or 60 miles of McDowell. That was poor supporting distance. Ii.--extracts from the report of General R. H. Milroy. May 7th I was first advised by my scouts and spies that a junor defense there. . . . Upon the next morning (the 8th instant) the enemy was seen upon the Bull Pasture Mountain, about one and three-fourths miles distant from McDowell, on my right and front. I commenced shelling them and sent out parties of skirmishers to endeavor to ascertain their numbers. At about 10 A. M. your brigade ar
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., I. (search)
ccessfully. The attacking force was composed of a good part of Milroy's men and of those of my immediate command who were least fatigued. The whole number engaged was 2600; of these we had just ten per cent. killed and wounded. We remained at McDowell, at the foot of the mountain, the point from which our troops moved to the attack through that night, buried our dead, sent off the wounded and all stores, and withdrew in good order toward Franklin in the early morning. Our march back to Frankanklin we kept Jackson with his whole force at bay with our still much inferior numbers, until General Fremont arrived there on the 13th of May. With the troops I had left behind at Franklin, when I marched to the relief of Milroy, I had at no time before Fremont arrived to take command more than 6500 men. On the 8th of May, Fremont was at Petersburg on his march from Lost Creek to Franklin, and certainly nowhere within less than 50 or 60 miles of McDowell. That was poor supporting distance.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Ii.--extracts from the report of General R. H. Milroy. (search)
ell. Having the day previous sent out a large portion of the 3d West Virginia and 32d and 75th Ohio Regiments to Shaw's Ridge and upon Shenandoah Mountain for the purpose of protecting my foraging and reconnoitering parties, I immediately ordered my whole command to concentrate at McDowell, and, expecting reenforcements, prepared for defense there. . . . Upon the next morning (the 8th instant) the enemy was seen upon the Bull Pasture Mountain, about one and three-fourths miles distant from McDowell, on my right and front. I commenced shelling them and sent out parties of skirmishers to endeavor to ascertain their numbers. At about 10 A. M. your brigade arrived. Desultory firing of a section of Hyman's battery and occasional skirmishing engaged the attention of the enemy during the morning. . . . In the afternoon, at about 3 o'clock, being informed by Captain George R. Latham, of the 2d West Virginia Volunteer Infantry, who, with his company, was engaged in skirmishing, that the reb
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