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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) (search)
rength of Pope's army at the time of Cedar Run, August 9. General Pope reports officially as follows:  Infantry.Artillery.Cavalry.Total. First corps (Seigel's)10,5509481,73013,228 Second corps (Banks')13,3431,2244,10418,671 Third corps (McDowell's)17,6049712,90421,479    41,4973,1438,73853,378 Deduct infantry brigade stationed at Winchester2,500  Deduct regiment and battery at Front Royal1,000  Deduct cavalry unfit for service3,000   6,500    Total 47.878 Note--Instead o at the time. Hence Pope's entire strength early in August, 1862, by his own report, was 47,878, less 3,000, or nearly 45,000 men. Of this force there was present at Cedar Run-- Banks' corps8,000 Bayard's cavalry1,200 Rickett's division of McDowell's corps7,000    16,200 Rickett arrived at nightfall too late to prevent the defeat of Banks, but in time to stay the further progress of the Confederates. Now as to the Federal losses, General Pope says: No report of killed and wo
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Recollections of General Beauregard's service in West Tennessee in the Spring of 1862. (search)
s pertinent to say that it was some time after dark before many of the brigades were organized and in the positions assigned them. It is not becoming in me to speak of the capacity of General Beauregard, but I may be permitted to say that he is certainly the last officer against whom the charge of want of military enterprise can be established; for he is the commander who, before the metal of our troops had been tested, arranged his command of 18,500 men to accept battle with the army of McDowell, 50,000 strong, whose forces he actually engaged the 18th of July at Bull Run. Animated by the plain dictates of prudence and foresight, he sought to be ready for the coming storm, which he had anticipated and predicted as early as the afternoon of the 5th. To have continued the conflict another hour — that is, until darkness on the 6th instant--would not have resulted in the capture of Grant's army, wrecked even as it was and cowering under the high river banks, yet sheltered by his gu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reminiscences of the Powhatan troop of cavalry in 1861. (search)
n ordered back by a courier, reaching camp about five A. M.--over twenty-two hours in the saddle. We propose to give no account of these battles, only to pick out and present a few company incidents and some chance meetings of the day. For hours that evening (21st) this little band of young and inexperienced horsemen had stood within range of the guns of the enemy--first at Mitchell's ford, where the main attack was anticipated — and then when the report of the movement on our left by McDowell (brought in and ascertained by Captain Wooldridge of the Goochland troop and Colonel G. W. Lay, of the staff), escorting Generals Johnston and Beauregard at full speed to the scene of action, whose own forces under under Cocke, Evans and others, were so gallantly sustaining themselves against great odds. This squadron took position at the foot of the hill in rear of the Lewis house, where General Johnston stood in his full view, and almost within the sound of his voice. Well does the
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 8.70 (search)
bald Stuart, Sr., acquired large landed estates, which he divided between his four children. His second son, and third child, Major Alexander Stuart, was, early in the Revolutionary War, commissioned major of the regiment commanded by Colonel Samuel McDowell; and, during Colonel McDowell's illness, commanded the regiment at the battle of Guilford Court-house. Two horses were killed under him in this action, and he himself, dangerously wounded, was left upon the field, and was captured by theColonel McDowell's illness, commanded the regiment at the battle of Guilford Court-house. Two horses were killed under him in this action, and he himself, dangerously wounded, was left upon the field, and was captured by the enemy. He was subsequently exchanged, and his sword was returned to him. This valued relic is now in the possession of his grandson, the Hon. Alexander H. H. Stuart, of Va. Judge Alexander Stuart, the youngest son of Major Alexander Stuart, was a lawyer by profession, and resided at various times in Virginia, in Illinois, and in Missouri. He held many honorable and responsible offices in each of these states. He died and was buried in Staunton, Va. His eldest son, the Hon. Archibald Stuar