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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 134 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 66 0 Browse Search
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The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The First great crime of the War. (search)
wed to have his own way, and had sent for General McDowell and me so that he might have somebody to e next evening at the same time, and that General McDowell and I should in the meantime get all the n of Judge Blair, the Postmaster General. General McDowell read a paper embodying our joint views, wirginia than to transport it by vessels. General McDowell was, however, in favor of the immediate m, in an apologetic way, why he had called General McDowell and me to these conferences, and asked Geexplain the proposed plan of operations. General McDowell did so, he and I differing slightly as toive it. During this time Governor Chase, General McDowell and I were standing in one of the window tween the York and James rivers, and that General McDowell's corps should land on the north side of he had disobeyed the President's orders. General McDowell remonstrated against the step which was a plan of turning Yorktown, by the movement of McDowell's corps on the north bank of the York river, [15 more...]
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Lee's West Virginia campaign. (search)
nd he was at once recognized as the officer whose disappearance at Rich Mountain had led to so much inquiry. He was sent a prisoner of war to the Federal headquarters, where he was courteously received. The defeat of General Garnett left McClellan in undisputed possession of all Northwestern Virginia. In order to secure his acquisition he strongly occupied some of the principal mountain passes, and took other measures for its permanent occupation. A few days later the total defeat of McDowell at Bull Run considerably changed the order of things. McClellan was called to take the command of the Army of the Potomac, and the greater part of his forces was withdrawn, leaving only a few thousand men to hold Northwestern Virginia. The result of McClellan's success in that quarter proved to be of much greater importance than was at first apprehended, by disheartening its loyal inhabitants and encouraging the doubtful or indifferent to give their adhesion to the Federal Government. Th
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The Black Horse cavalry. (search)
e the lamented Captain John Quincey Marr was killed, the Black Horse, at the request of their captain, were ordered to that point, from which they performed much arduous scouting duty, and became well known to the enemy. Upon the advance of General McDowell, the Black Horse rejoined the army at Manassas. On the 4th of July, in an attempt to ambuscade a detachment of the enemy, two members were killed and several wounded by the mistaken fire of a South Carolina regiment of infantry. In the memagain united, Lieutenant Payne, with his detachment, was ordered to report to his command. The Black Horse, thus consolidated, took part in the great battle of the 30th, the Second Manassas, in which General Pope was as disastrously defeated as McDowell had been on the same ground. In this engagement, many members of the Black Horse were fatally wounded, among them Erasmus Helm, Jr., than whom there was no braver soldier nor more charming gentleman. The second battle of Manassas continued
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson and his men. (search)
Stonewall Jackson and his men. Major H. Kyd Douglas. It was on the field of Manassas, a bright Sunday afternoon, the 21st of July, 1861. The armies of McDowell and Beauregard had been grappling with each other since early morning,and, in their mutual slaughter, took no note of the sacredness of the day, nor its brightness. In Washington General Scott was anxiously awaiting the result of his skilful plan of battle, and General Johnston had come down from the Valley of Virginia, in responsnot to be compared with that necessary to inaugurate it. Audacity, audacity, always audacity, was the motto of Danton. So thought Jackson, too. After the defeat of Banks at Winchester, and before he moved forward to Harper's Ferry, he knew that McDowell and Fremont were moving against his rear, and what their design was; and yet he marched boldly into the trap prepared for him, and then broke it into pieces and escaped. But as a soldier, he was guided by another principle which he once tersely
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), The career of General A. P. Hill. (search)
commander nor his men to rest upon these laurels. Already, while McClellan was gathering up the bruised fragments of his grand army at Berkeley, the Federal Government, not dismayed by disaster, .was organizing a new movement upon Richmond. From the Army of the Mississippi, where he had won, in easy circumstances, some incipient reputation, General John Pope was called to measure swords with Lee. The remains of the armies sent into the Valley originally under Fremont, Banks, Shields, and McDowell, were moved forward upon Culpepper Court-House with the design of seizing upon Gordonsville. This force of sixty thousand men, preceded by the boastful declarations of their leader, advanced without interruption until a point eight miles south of Culpepper was reached. There it encountered General Jackson, who had been dispatched with Ewell's and Hill's divisions, and his own under General Taliaferro, to resist this new combination; and on the 9th of August the battle of Cedar run was f
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure), Stonewall Jackson's Valley campaign. (search)
of Fremont's force some fifteen thousand men. McDowell, with thirty thousand men, had drawn away frontrating at Fredericksburg. This movement of McDowell had released Ewell and left him free to aid Jarket, and ordered to Fredericksburg to swell McDowell's Corps to over forty thousand men. Banks is ton went to Fredericksburg to confer with General McDowell, found that Shields had already reached tosition, I have been compelled to suspend General McDowell's movements to join you. The enemy are mat that point. This is now our situation. If McDowell's force was now beyond our reach, we should bpletely neutralizing the forty thousand under McDowell, and thus disconcerting McClellan's plans. our too soon, for before he reached that town McDowell's advance had poured over the Blue ridge, drithen went into camp exhausted, as he states. McDowell, with two divisions, had remained at Front Rol the last moment, until, indeed, the head of McDowell's column was but twelve or fourteen miles fro[26 more...]
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 7. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Jackson's Valley campaign of 1862. (search)
. Shields was detached from Banks and sent to McDowell, and on May 17th the latter was ordered to prton went to Fredericksburg to confer with General McDowell, found that Shields had already reached tin on the following Monday (May 26th). See McDowell's testimony before referred to. McClellan wasing been taken from him to swell a column for McDowell to aid you at Richmond, and the rest of his fou, has always been my reason for withholding McDowell's forces from you. Please understand this, anto over whelm him were already closing in. McDowell, with 20,000 men, was hurrying towards Front ur too soon, for .before he reached that town McDowell's advance had poured over the Blue Ridge, drirejoined the main body. Meantime Shields and McDowell had been bewildered at Front Royal by the celive days of masterly retreat. The failure of McDowell to attack him at Strasburg caused Jackson to ies, and effected the permanent withdrawal of McDowell's corps from the forces operating against Ric[23 more...]