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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 144 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 113 11 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 93 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 73 3 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 60 12 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 60 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 55 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 51 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 42 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for McDowell or search for McDowell in all documents.

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Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 5: Marylanders in the campaigns of 1861. (search)
nd, covered his front so thoroughly with cavalry patrols and pickets as to interpose an impenetrable veil between Patterson and himself. On July 18, 1861, General McDowell moved out of Alexandria on Beauregard at Fairfax Court House. Beauregard retired behind Bull Run. McDowell on the 19th made a heavy reconnoissance in forceut noon, the Fourth brigade, Colonel Elzey, arrived at the junction of the Manassas Gap and Orange & Alexandria railroads. The command was at once disembarked. McDowell's heavy guns were pounding away toward the east, the first hostile fire the men had ever heard. They were formed: First Maryland on the right, Third Ten. nesseline went with a yell—up the hill—through the Yankee line, or rather where it had been. It had gone, dissolved into mist. Elzey pressed right on. He was behind McDowell's right and he never stopped to draw breath. The whole Union line crumpled up, and First Manassas was won. As the Maryland colonel rode proudly down on the righ
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 6: Marylanders in 1862 under Generals Joseph E. Johnston and Stonewall Jackson. (search)
n, in the departments and in McClellan's headquarters, kept his headquarters perfectly advised of the intentions of General McClellan. They had reported in time McDowell's projected movement on Bull Run, which resulted in the first battle of Manassas. In November Johnston withdrew from the line of Fairfax Court House to Centrevickson had vanished in a night, without a word, without a trace. So Ewell impatiently waited a week for directions and at length came the telegram from Stonewall—McDowell, May 9th—God has given us a victory at McDowell to-day. That was all, but it was sufficient. Without stopping to take breath, Jackson sped back to Staunton, en one leap on his prey. The army of the Valley marched ten to twelve miles a day, then twenty, then thirty, and it was on Banks before he knew Jackson had left McDowell. Colonel Steuart had been promoted brigadier-general on March 28th; Lieutenant-Colonel Johnson colonel, and Major Dorsey, lieutenant-colonel. General Steuart
Brig.-Gen. Bradley T. Johnson, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 2.1, Maryland (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
and to Washington, after which he resigned his commission and made his way to Richmond, where he was commissioned lieutenant-colonel in the Confederate service. At the first battle of Manassas, Elzey, then ranking as senior colonel in Kirby Smith's bride, had the honor, after General Smith was wounded, of leading the successful charge, on the afternoon of the day's hard fighting, which turned the tide of battle, broke the Federal forces, and ended in a rout of the almost victorious army of McDowell. For this gallant service he was complimented by General Beauregard, who styled him the Blucher of the field, and was promoted brigadier-general on the field by President Davis, who had witnessed the gallant action. In command of a brigade General Elzey was with Stonewall Jackson all through his celebrated Valley campaign of 1862, and the opening of the Seven Days fighting before Richmond. At the battle of Port Republic he was slightly wounded in the leg, and his horse shot under him, a