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Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 204 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 2. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 144 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 113 11 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 93 1 Browse Search
An English Combatant, Lieutenant of Artillery of the Field Staff., Battlefields of the South from Bull Run to Fredericksburgh; with sketches of Confederate commanders, and gossip of the camps. 73 3 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 60 12 Browse Search
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 60 6 Browse Search
Alfred Roman, The military operations of General Beauregard in the war between the states, 1861 to 1865 55 15 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 51 3 Browse Search
General Joseph E. Johnston, Narrative of Military Operations During the Civil War 42 18 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for McDowell or search for McDowell in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
o to show what Flag-officer Goldsborough thought of the Merrimac, and in citing them, I wish it to be understood that I intend to cast no imputations upon him and his gallant officers. I have been told by some of them that he had positive orders from his government not to attack the Merrimac; and I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Merrimac and Monitor. (search)
o to show what Flag-officer Goldsborough thought of the Merrimac, and in citing them, I wish it to be understood that I intend to cast no imputations upon him and his gallant officers. I have been told by some of them that he had positive orders from his government not to attack the Merrimac; and I believe it to be case. Let us now see what some of the other officials thought. At a council of war, assembled March 13th, 1862, at Fairfax C. H., Va., present, Generals Keyes, Heintzelman, McDowell, and Sumner, it was decided that General McClellan's plan to attack Richmond by York river should be adopted; provided, first, that the enemy's vessel, Merrimac, can be neutralized. Page 55, series 1, vol. 5, official records of the Union and Confederate armies. On page 751 I find the following letter: Adjutant-General's office, Washington, March 13, 1862. Hon. Gideon Welles, Secretary of the Navy. Sir,—I am directed by the Secretary of War to say that he places at you disposal an
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Unveiling of Valentine's Recumbent figure of Lee at Lexington, Va., June 28th, 1883. (search)
glory till pity cried, no more. Swift was Lee to plan, and swift to execute. Making a feint of reinforcing Jackson in the Valley, startling the Federal authorities with apprehensions of attack on the Potomac lines, and practically eliminating McDowell, who with his corps, remained near Fredericksburg, he suddenly descends with Jackson on the right and rear of McClellan, and ere thirty days have passed since he assumed command, Richmond has been saved, and the fields around her made immortal; ure-Room and Pulpit—what famous champions and teachers of the right, what trusty workers and leaders in literature and law, and arts, and arms, have they not found in her sons! Seven Governors of States—amongst them Crittenden, of Kentucky, and McDowell, Letcher, and Kemper, of Virginia; eleven United States Senators—amongst them Parker, of Virginia, Breckinridge, of Kentucky, H. S. Foote, of Mississippi, and William C. Preston, of South Carolina; more than a score of congressmen, twoscore and <
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee and Scott. (search)
encomiums of General Lee as the outflow of merely personal friendship and its admirations, or else of that zeal, or affected zeal, of an exaggerated advocacy, which is so fashionable in America, and which seems to be a tendency in all forms of hero worship. But I assure you neither is true. For I have or had several personal friends on each side of that wretched war whom I admired and loved just as much as Robert E. Lee—notably A. Sidney Johnston, George H. Thomas, W. T. Sherman, and General McDowell and others. But my naked, solid judgment is this: that 1 can neither find, within my own observation and experience, nor yet in modern nor ancient history, one single case of any hero or patriot or philosopher of them all who turned his back upon a more than imperial crown, and his face and steps towards doubts and fears, uncertainties, failures and subjugation, save one alone—Robert E. Lee! These, my friend, are my reasons for having said that I was below no enthusiast-rebel of you