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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 650 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 314 2 Browse Search
Elias Nason, McClellan's Own Story: the war for the union, the soldiers who fought it, the civilians who directed it, and his relations to them. 271 1 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 99 1 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 99 1 Browse Search
Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 71 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I. 52 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 6, 1863., [Electronic resource] 10 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: may 31, 1861., [Electronic resource] 8 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume I.. You can also browse the collection for Irwin McDowell or search for Irwin McDowell in all documents.

Your search returned 27 results in 4 document sections:

Virginia, and pretty accurately discriminates the Counties wherein Slavery and Secession did, from those wherein they did not, at any time, predominate, yet three or four Counties — Monroe, Greenbrier, &c.--which geographically pertain to West Virginia, have, either voluntarily or under duress, adhered to Old Virginia and the Rebellion. note.--The originally proposed State of Kanawha included within her boundaries only the Counties of Virginia lying north and west of, but not including, McDowell, Mercer, Monroe, Green. brier, and Pocahontas--thirty-nine in all, with a total population in 1860 of 280,691, whereof 6,894 were slaves. The Constitution of West Virginia expressly included the five counties above named, making the total population 315,969, of whom 10,147 were slaves. It further provided that the counties of Pendleton, Hardy, Hampshire, Frederick, Berkeley, Jefferson, and Morgan, might also be embraced within the new State, provided their people should, by vote, express
the American people were now entering. Gen. McDowell, having firmly established himself on the Gen. Robert C. Schenck, under orders from Gen. McDowell, left camp near Alexandria, with 700 of Con Grand Army, commanded in the field by Gen. Irwin McDowell, but directed from Washington by Lieut.assas Junction, and purposed to remain. Gen. McDowell's army was moved up to and concentrated aron them. This fact explains and justifies Gen. McDowell's (or Scott's) order of battle. This was, and devastation at this time being fearful. McDowell, with the aid of Patterson's division of 20,0ax and Arlington, entirely unassailed. Gen. McDowell reports our losses in this engagement at 4uld be dispatched to the front-insisting that McDowell had men enough --that he needed no cavalry, esition of our forces at that moment: Under McDowell, at Fairfax and Centerville30,000 Under Patho was most earnest and active in opposing Gen. McDowell's request, and insisting on an immediate d[10 more...]
, in defiance of every dictate of prudence and of common sense. Neither the President, nor the Secretary of War, nor Gen. McDowell, nor the maligned and detested Radicals — who were naturally anxious that our 75,000 three-months' men should not be ice — had ever desired or expected any such conflict as this. It was Gen. Scott who had given the orders under which Gen. McDowell advanced and fought on Sunday, the 21st of July. Gen. Cameron, the Secretary of War, who was at Centerville during thect, I hope I may be permitted to notice the charge made against me, on the floor of Congress, that I did not stop Brig. Gen. McDowell's movement upon Manassas Junction after I had been informed of the reenforcement sent thither from Winchester, thohad ever been seen on this continent. It was not only far better drilled and fitted for service than that with which Gen. McDowell had advanced to Centerville and Bull Run, but it was better constituted, in that its members — not one of them a cons<
speech at Charleston, 408. McCulloch, Gen. Ben., 413; 575; defeated at Dug Springs, Mo., 577; commands at Wilson's Creek, 578; 581; his proclamation, 582; is joined by Price at Neosho, 589. McGowan, Mr., of S. C., in Convention, 334-5. McDowell, Gen., 533; his General Order No. 4, 534-5; moves on Centerville, 539; his plan of battle, 540; report of our losses, 545; 550-1; 552; report with regard to the three months men, 553; 618. McDougall, Mr., of Cal., 571. MacFARLANDarland, wicts the movement on Centerville, 539; dispatch to Gen. Patterson, 539; The Times's account of a conversation with, 547; Blair's strictures on, 548-9 ; letter to The National Intelligencer, 549; his culpable neglect to send sufficient forces with McDowell, 550; 556; his requisition on Gen. Fremont, 587; removes Fremont, 593; is largely to be blamed for the Bull Run disaster; his comments on Patterson's testimony, 618. se De Kay, report of losses at Bull Run, 545. Seddon, James A., of Va., r