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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 18 12 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 7 7 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 5 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 9, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 3 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 3 3 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 3 1 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for McElroy or search for McElroy in all documents.

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four lieutenants were also among the slain. The loss among the men was 140. The Sixteenth regiment, through an error of its guide, became separated from its brigade and was called upon to support another brigade. Always ready for a fight.Colonel McElroy did his part with skill and courage, and the regiment suffered a loss of about 200 men. No better example of the hotness of the fire to which these regiments were exposed can be found than in the losses of one of the companies. Captain Flowost to melt away before the concentrated fire of our artillery and infantry; yet others pressed on, followed by supports as dashing and as brave as their predecessors. In the repeated assaults of the afternoon, the Sixteenth North Carolina, Colonel McElroy, and the Twenty-second, Lieut.-Col. R. H. Gray, won enviable reputation, as Gen. A. P. Hill reports, by carrying the crest of a hill, and were in the camp of the enemy, but were driven back by overwhelming numbers. Toward night, Longstreet,
dericksburg. Pender's brigade, stationed to Lane's left, was not exposed to so severe an ordeal as Lane's. When the skirmishers and sharpshooters in his front became too annoying, his Twenty-second regiment, Major Cole, drove them away. Colonel McElroy, with the Sixteenth North Carolina, was posted in advance of the line near the railroad cut to support a battery. While there, and with his left entirely unprotected, a brigade of Federals took him unawares and captured an officer and fifte flankers. General Law, of Hood's division, saw the danger that the battery and regiment were in, and detaching the Fifty-seventh and Fifty-fourth North Carolina, both new regiments never under fire before, he advanced with them, and joined by McElroy, the three regiments dispersed the enemy. During the engagement, a body of the enemy opened fire from the woods bordering the run, upon the left of the advancing line. This was checked by a fire from the left of the Fifty-seventh and Fifty-fou