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braces up, advances, halts soon, but comes no more back. The left is not overpowered yet. We have had two hours of exceedingly severe artillery and musketry fighting. The enemy still holds a little of the ground we had, but the chances seem almost even. One phase — a type of many. I cannot trace the movements further in detail; let me give one phase of the fight, fit type of many more. Some Massachusetts batteries--Captain Bigelow's, Captain Phillips's, two or three more under Captain McGilvry of Maine--were planted on the extreme left, advanced now well down to the Emmetsburgh road, with infantry in their front — the first division, I think, of Sickles's corps. A little after five, a fierce rebel charge drove back the infantry and menaced the batteries. Orders are sent to Bigelow on the extreme left, to hold his position at every hazard short of sheer annihilation, till a couple more batteries can be brought to his support. Reserving his fire a little, then with depressed
new position was commanded by the Rebel batteries posted on Seminary ridge in his front, scarcely half a mile distant; while magnificent lines of battle, a mile and a half long, swept up to his front and flanks, crushing him black Agate [Whitelaw Reid], of The Cincinnati Gazette, gives the following incident of this sanguinary fray: Let me give one please of the fight — fit type of many more. Some Massachusetts batteries--Capt. Bigelow's, Capt. Phillips's, two or three more under Capt. McGilvry, of Maine--were planted on the extreme left, advanced now well down to the Emmitsburg road, with infantry in their front — the first division, I think, of Sickles's corps. A little after 5, a fierce Rebel charge drove back the infantry and menaced the batteries. Orders are sent to Bigelow on the extreme left, to hold his position at every hazard short of slicer annihilation, till a couple more batteries can be brought to his support. Reserving his fire a little, then with depressed gu
t position, has been the subject alike of adverse criticism and approval by military authorities. It was to turn this line and obtain possession of Little Round Top, the key of the Federal position, that Longstreet made the memorable assault, early in the afternoon, upon the lines of Sickles and Doubleday. The Third Corps was the extreme left, its infantry in front and behind it artillery,—several Massachusetts batteries, among them Bigelow's and Phillips's, and several companies under Capt. McGilvry of Maine. Later, the Fifth Corps arrived and were in position, and afterward the left wing was further reinforced by the infantry of the Sixth Corps. Before this line was a ravine, and beyond the ravine, sloping down to a stone-wall, was a wheatfield. There was a skirmish at noon near the Emmetsburg road, for the possession of some cattle. This brought on the engagement of the day. Nothing could exceed the vim, the terrible energy of the Confederate attack. Between two and thre