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d the road nearly to Reams' Station. This road was vital to the comfort of the Confederates. So A. P. Hill was directed to stop its destruction. Hill took with him the North Carolina brigades of Scales, Lane, Cooke, MacRae, and in addition, McGowan's and Anderson's brigades, and two of Mahone's. On Hill's approach, Hancock formed behind some old intrenchments constructed in June. General Gibbon was posted in the left half of these, and General Miles occupied the right half. Gregg's force was on the flank, and seems to have been partly dismounted and intrenched. The first attack of Hill, about 2 o'clock, seems to have been made only by the brigades of McGowan and Scales. They were repulsed. At 5 o'clock, General Hill sent forward three North Carolina brigades, Cooke's, Lane's (under General Conner) and MacRae's, to make a second attempt. Captain Graham in his Regimental History states that the combined strength of the three brigades was only 1,750. These brigades dashed f
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 2: (search)
k and file, stationed as follows: In the First district, Col. R. F. Graham, 1,254; Second district, Brigadier-General Ripley, 8,672; Third district, Brigadier-General Evans, 5,400; Fourth district, Col. P. H. Colquitt, 1,582; Fifth district, Col. P. H. Colquitt, 2,222; Sixth district, Brigadier-General Drayton, 3,45; total, 22,275. The above statement includes infantry, artillery and cavalry. They were all South Carolina troops except Phillips' Georgia legion (infantry), Thornton's Virginia battery, and a company of Georgia cavalry, under Capt. T. H. Johnson. Manigault's Tenth volunteers and Moragne‘s Nineteenth, with the two Tennessee regiments under Brigadier-General Donelson, had been sent to Corinth to reinforce Beauregard in the west, and Dunovant's Twelfth, Edwards' Thirteenth, McGowan's Fourteenth (Col. James Jones having resigned), and Orr's rifles had gone to the aid of General Johnston in Virginia. Such was the situation in South Carolina at the close of April, 1862.
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
ack a second time. A third advance was ordered, and now the Fourteenth, Col. Samuel McGowan, being by Gregg's request relieved from outpost duty, was conducted by hde, Capt. Harry Hammond, to his right flank. Passing through Crenshaw's guns, McGowan's men moved right forward, supported by the other shattered regiments of GreggLeading his regiment to the right of the Thirteenth and across the hollow, Colonel McGowan arrived just in time to repulse the advance of the enemy and prevent them rt, the loss was not so heavy, 8 killed and 40 wounded. In the Fourteenth, Colonel McGowan and Maj. W. J. Carter were wounded, as were also Captains Brown, Taggart aenemy's hands, his brigade was driven back and scattered, when, says Hill, Colonel McGowan, with the Fourteenth South Carolina, retrieved our ground. Special mention is made by General Hill in his report of Colonels McGowan, Edwards and Hamilton, and Lieutenant-Colonel Simpson, of the Fourteenth. Gregg lost 12 killed and 105 w
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 7: (search)
eping at night in rear of our artillery in the road near Bristoe Station. General McGowan, whose report is quoted, continues: The next morning we reached Manassft. But the right was about to be overpowered and crushed, when Gregg sent in McGowan, his only reserve. The Fourteenth rushed upon the crowded ranks of intruders man of his brigade. When General Hill sent to ask if he could hold out, says McGowan, he replied modestly he thought he could, adding, as if casually, that his ammis last conflict, as well as his able lieutenant-colonel, D. A. Ledbetter. Colonels McGowan and Barnes, Lieutenant-Colonel Farrow, and Majors Brockman and McCorkle weollowing officers are mentioned among the killed and wounded in the reports of McGowan and McCrady, the former reporting for the brigade: Killed: Orr's Rifles—Cod, R. M. Crocker, S. J. Greer, W. T. Thom and J. B. Fellers. Fourteenth— Col. Samuel McGowan, Capts. C. M. Stuckey and J. N. Brown; Lieuts. W. J. Robertson, W. J. Ca
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 9: (search)
ical moment the brigade was without its head. Col. D. H. Hamilton, of the First, senior officer, quickly grasping the situation, changed his front on his tenth company, to the rear, and opened on the mass of the enemy at close quarters, the left company of the rifles, under Lieutenant Charles, taking post on his right. Holding his position, Hamilton was immediately supported by the other regiments of the brigade, the Twelfth coming up on his left and the Thirteenth and Fourteenth, under McGowan, on his right, and they stood firmly against Meade's attack, delivering their fire at close quarters, without giving a foot. Driven from their guns, Orr's rifles were helpless, but every man who survived hailed the moment of his ability to regain his place in the front. Some of them, seizing their guns from the stacks, fought in the ranks of the First regiment. Sergeant Pratt, of Company B, rallied a number of the men, and took his place on the right of Lieutenant Charles' company. The F
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 12: (search)
Walker, Brown, Carter, Andrews and McIntosh. McGowan's brigade, on April 29th, occupied the same plight division, was now commanded by Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan, who was colonel of the Fourteenth Srth known in the army of Northern Virginia as McGowan's brigade. McGowan's brigade, after being enMcGowan's brigade, after being engaged in skirmishing, and under artillery fire on the 1st, moved out with Hill's division early on nging for the morning's attack. At sunset, McGowan's brigade had reached that part of the field nd, we were drawn up in line, by order of General McGowan, on the plank road, the Fourteenth regime part. Kershaw on the right with McLaws, and McGowan on the left with Stuart, were in the front lion, McLaws and Early. Of the part taken by McGowan's brigade, General Heth, commanding Hill's division, said: I ordered Generals McGowan and Archer to move forward. . . . The light division fo Here, in the midst of a desperate fight, General McGowan and his able and gallant adjutant-general[3 more...]
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 15: (search)
j.-Gen. D. H. Hill. In the Third army corps (A. P. Hill's), South Carolina was represented by McGowan's brigade, Hill's light division —North Carolinians, South Carolinians and Georgians—now being , Pa., on the 28th of June, they remained there until the 30th, then marching to Fayetteville. McGowan's brigade, with A. P. Hill, also occupied a position near Fayetteville on the 29th. Stuart's cnder's advance was with Thomas' Georgians on the left of the road, and Lane, Scales and Perrin (McGowan's brigade) on the right. The combined assault of Pender and Ewell's divisions swept the hill and driving him through the town of Gettysburg. This special mention by the corps commander of McGowan's veterans, under Perrin, was well deserved. Never was a brigade better handled in battle, and massing of artillery and infantry on the crest made it no longer tenable. The total loss in McGowan's brigade at Gettysburg was 100 killed and 477 wounded. Including the loss on the retreat, the
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 18: (search)
r. Abner Perrin, promoted to brigadier-general, commanded McGowan's brigade; Col. D. H. Hamilton, the First regiment; Col. Jton, the Palmetto Sharpshooters by Col. Joseph Walker. General McGowan was again in command of his brigade, of Wilcox's divisFederals on the 6th fell upon the right flank and front of McGowan's brigade, forcing it to double up and fall back on Poaguet's purpose, will not be given here, but the part taken by McGowan's brigade deserves special mention. This brigade, stationapproach, asked: What troops are these? and was answered, McGowan's South Carolina brigade. There are no better soldiers ind with the rebel yell they went into the inner line, where McGowan was wounded by a minie ball, and compelled to yield the coook command. The fierceness of this close engagement by McGowan's brigade, Colonel Hunt says: Accident gave the brigadering the night Bratton's brigade covered the withdrawal of McGowan's brigade from the bloody angle, and without firing a gun,
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 20: (search)
agan; Fifteenth, Col. John B. Davis; Twentieth, Col. Stephen M. Boykin; Third battalion, Lieut.-Col. William G. Rice. McGowan's brigade (Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan commanding) of Wilcox's division, Third army corps: First regiment, Lieut.-Col. AndBrig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan commanding) of Wilcox's division, Third army corps: First regiment, Lieut.-Col. Andrew P. Butler; Twelfth, Capt. Robert M. Kerr; Thirteenth, Capt. David R. Duncan; Fourteenth, Lieut.-Col Edward Croft; Orr's rifles, Maj. James T. Robertson. Cavalry brigade of Brig.-Gen. John Dunovant, of Maj.-Gen. M. C. Butler's division, cavalrack assigned to them. On the 25th A. P. Hill attacked the Federals again at Reams' Station and won a splendid victory. McGowan's brigade was present, and Pegram's artillery took a prominent part. Dunovant's cavalry brigade was held in reserve by nd rifles, Colonels Hagood, Coward, Steedman and Bowen, and the Palmetto sharpshooters, Capt. A. H. Foster. Brig.-Gen. Samuel McGowan's brigade, Wilcox's division, Third corps: First regiment (provisional army), Lieut.-Col. A. P. Butler; Twelfth
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Biographical (search)
une 1, 1864, he was promoted brigadier-general, and was assigned to command of McGowan's and Lane's brigades. Subsequently, as acting major-general, he commanded a division consisting of the brigades of McGowan, Lane and Bushrod Johnson. On the return of General Mc-Gowan to duty, General Conner was assigned permanently to the mond & Danville system, of which he was elected vice-president. Brigadier-General Samuel McGowan Brigadier-General Samuel McGowan was born of Scotch-Irish parenBrigadier-General Samuel McGowan was born of Scotch-Irish parentage in Laurens county, October 19, 1819, and was graduated at the South Carolina college in 1841. He embarked in the practice of law at Abbeville, but answered the at Fredericksburg. There General Gregg was killed, and in January, 1863, Colonel McGowan was promoted brigadier-general and became Gregg's successor in command of , commanded the regiment at Chancellorsville, where, after the wounding of General McGowan and Colonel Edwards, he had command of the remnant of the brigade in the S
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