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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Additional Sketches Illustrating the services of officers and Privates and patriotic citizens of South Carolina. (search)
gade and appointed him ordnance officer. General McGowan had selected him as the brigade historian he was detailed to serve on the staff of General McGowan, holding this position from that time to months. He participated in all the battles of McGowan's brigade, with the exception of Reams' Statid he received at Deep Bottom. His history of McGowan's brigade, published in 1866, has been univered by the election of James Jones colonel, Samuel McGowan lieutenant-colonel, and the late Chief Jusby Capts. Frank Hampton, W. K. Easley and Captain McGowan, formed the Third battalion of South Caro He was asigned to Orr's regiment of rifles, McGowan's brigade, Wilcox's division, A. P. Hill's coand of Company A, battalion of sharpshooters, McGowan's brigade, Wilcox's division, A. P. Hill's coonspicuous in the successive assaults made by McGowan's brigade, which finally succeeded in the recafterward promoted to lieutenant-colonel. Samuel McGowan was colonel of this regiment. With his re[10 more...]
ding the gallant Colonel Baker, Lieut.-Col. A. M. Feltus, Adjt. D. B. L. Lowe and Ensign Mixon of the Sixteenth; Colonel Hardin and Adjutant Peel, of the Nineteenth; Captains McAfee, Davis and Reynhardt of the Forty-eighth, and Lieutenant Bew of the Twelfth. Maj. E. C. Councell (afterward promoted colonel and killed), Capt. Harry Smith and Private Edward Perault of the Sixteenth; Lieut.-Col. S. B. Thomas of the Twelfth, and Courier Charles Weil were mentioned for conspicuous bravery. Gen. Samuel McGowan, part of whose brigade got into a portion of the trenches, reported that his men found in the trenches General Harris and what remained of his gallant brigade, and they (Mississippians and Carolinians), mingled together, made one of the most gallant and stubborn defenses recorded in history. Davis' brigade took part in the fighting at the Wilderness with Longstreet and during the entire campaign, held the lines east of Richmond, and in August fought with gallantry at Ream's Station
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 3 (search)
inspection reports. Colonel Thomas J. Simmons. Fourteenth Georgia, Major W. L. Goldsmith. Thirty-fifth Georgia, Lieutenant-Colonel W. H. McCullohs. Forty-fifth Georgia, Captain A. W. Gibson. Forty-ninth Georgia, Colonel John T. Jordan. McGowan's brigade. actual commanders given as shown by inspection reports. Brigadier-General Samuel McGowan. First South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel A. P. Butler. Twelfth South Carolina, Captain R. M. Kerr. Thirteenth South Carolina, Captain DBrigadier-General Samuel McGowan. First South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel A. P. Butler. Twelfth South Carolina, Captain R. M. Kerr. Thirteenth South Carolina, Captain D. R. Duncan. Fourteenth South Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel Edward Croft. Orr's Rifles, Major J. T. Robertson. Lane's brigade. actual commanders given as shown by inspection reports. Brigadier-General James H. Lane. Seventh North Carolina, Captain J. G. Harris. Eighteenth North Carolina, Lieutenant-Colonel J. W. McGill. Twenty-eighth North Carolina, Major S. N. Stowe. Thirty-third North Carolina, Captain W. J. Callais. Thirty-seventh North Carolina, Colonel W. M. Barbour. Scal
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
either side were engaged at any time during the afternoon. General McGowan, who made the report for our brigade after General Gregg's deah Carolina, also met a soldier's death. Colonels Barnes, Edwards, McGowan, Lieutenant-Colonels McCorkle, Farrow and McCrady, and Major Brocks to the loss of the reports of this battle. The report of General McGowan, admirable as it is, was made several months after the battle,t, then the Twelfth (Colonel Barnes), and then the Fourteenth (Colonel McGowan); the last mentioned regiment thrown back along the worm fenceove them back across the railroad track with great slaughter. General McGowan reports that the opposing forces at one time delivered their vt enables me thus to supply an omission in the facts furnished General McGowan when, after the deaths of General Gregg and Colonel Barnes, anstep by step we pressed on them every inch gained by us, until Colonel McGowan, with the Fourteenth of our brigade and the Forty-ninth Georgi
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Appendix. (search)
Appendix. In Caldwell's history of Gregg's-McGowan's brigade, the loss of the brigade at Manassas, is given as follows. The official reports make the loss 619, a small discrepancy which might easily creep in, and which it is impossible now to correct KilledWounded.Aggregate. First Regiment24119143 Orr's Regiment—Rifles1997116 Twelfth Regiment.24121145 Thirteenth Regiment26118144 Fourteenth Regiment85765 —————— Total101512613 The following were the casualties among the offi O. E. Edwards, Lieutenant-Colonel T. Stobo Farrow and Major B. T. Brockman, Captains R. L. Bowden, P. A. Eichelberger, J. W. Meetze, Lieutenants J. D. Copeland, J. S. Green, W. T. Thorn, J. B. Fellows, R. M. Crocker; Fourteenth Regiment: Colonel Samuel McGowan, Captains Charles M. Stickey and Joseph N. Brown, Lieutenants W. J. Robertson, M. T. Hutchins,—— Carter, and John H. Allen—33. Total, killed and wounded, 44. Lieutenant-Colonels Cadwallader Jones, of the Twelfth, and Will
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), From the Rapidan to Spotsylvania Courthouse. (search)
General Kershaw extended so as to allow Ramseur to be withdrawn, and as Daniel's right was unprotected, Ramseur was sent in there. He retook the works to Daniel's right along his whole brigade front by a charge of unsurpassed gallantry. But the salient was still held by the enemy, and a most deadly fire poured on his right flank. Accordingly, Harris's Mississippi brigade, which came to my assistance about 9 A. M., was sent to Ramseur's right; but as it still failed to fill the trenches, McGowan's South Carolina brigade, which arrived an hour later, was ordered to the same point. Only part of this brigade succeeded in reaching the trenches and joining Harris's brigade. Spite of the terrible flank-fire to which they were yet exposed, the brave troops of these three brigades held their ground till 3 A. M. the 13th May, when ordered back to the new line. General Daniel was killed and General Ramseur severely wounded early in the day, but the latter refused to leave the field. The
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Lee's Lieutenants. (search)
Lawton, Savannah, Ga. T. M. Logan, Richmond, Va. A. L. Long, Charlottesville, Va. Robert Lowry, Jackson, Miss. Walter B. Lane, Texas. Joseph H. Lewis, Kentucky. W. G. Lewis, North Carolina. William McComb, Gordonsville, Va. Samuel McGowan, Abbeville, S. C. John T. Morgan, United States Senate. T. T. Munford, Lynchburg, Va. H. B. Mabry, Texas. W. W. Mackall, Warrenton, Va. George Maney, Nashville, Tenn. James G. Martin, North Carolina. John McCausland, West Virgite, E. C. Walthall, J. T. Morgan, M. C. Butler, A. H. Colquitt, R. L. Gibson, and M. W. Ransom, have graced the United States Senate, and Generals Gordon, Hampton, Buckner, Fitzhugh Lee, Bate, Kemper, Bonham, Colquitt, Haygood, Lowry, Marmaduke, McGowan, Nicholas, O'Neale, and Scales, have been Governors of their respective States. Time and space forbid further particulars, but we do not hesitate to say that after that sad day at Appomattox our Confederate soldiers—generals, colonels, captai
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 20. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.4 (search)
George D. Johnson, Civil Service Commissioner. Washington, D. C. Robert D. Johnson, Birmingham, Alabama. A. R. Johnson, Texas. J. D. Kennedy, Camden, South Carolina. William H. King, Austin, Texas. William W. Kirkland, New York. James H. Lane, Auburn, Alabama. A. R. Lawton, Savannah, Georgia. T. M. Logan, Richmond, Virginia. Robert Lowry, Jackson, Mississippi. Joseph H. Lewis, Kentucky. W. G. Lewis, Tarboro, North Carolina. William McComb, Gordonsville, Virginia. Samuel McGowan, Abbeville, South Carolina. John T. Morgan, United States Senate. T. T. Munford, Lynchburg, Virginia. George Maney, Nashville. John McCausland, West Virginia. Henry E. McCullock, Texas. W. R. Miles, Mississippi. William Miller, Florida. B. McGlathan, Savannah, Georgia. John C. Moore, Texas. Francis T. Nichols, New Orleans, Louisiana. R. L. Page, Norfolk, Virginia. W. H. Payne, Warrenton, Virginia. W. F. Perry, Glendale, Kentucky. Roger A. Pryor, New York City.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
, where it stood and fought to within thirty paces of the enemy's artillery until thrice ordered to retreat. We fell back again to the parapet at Hatcher's Run, rested the 30th there, and on the 31st again were ordered to fall in on the left of McGowan's Brigade and charge the enemy. The 59th were left to guard the trenches, and the 26th, 34th and 46th went into the charge. They, with McGowan's Brigade, did good execution in staggering the overpowering columns of Meade, and in delaying theirMcGowan's Brigade, did good execution in staggering the overpowering columns of Meade, and in delaying their advance to Five Forks. In these two fights a number of the best and bravest fell among the killed and wounded, among whom were Lieutenant-Colonel Harrison, of the 34th; Captain Barksdale, of the 59th, and Lieutenant Barksdale Warwick, of my staff, who died with a smile of the guadia certaminis on his face, struck whilst waving his sword and shouting Charge! Charge! On the night of the 31st we fell back across Hatcher's Run to Sutherland's on the S. S. R. Road and pressed forward after Hu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
e musket, and in short the desperate thrusts and parries of life and death encounter proved, indeed, that Greek had met Greek, when the Alabama boys fell upon the sons of Pennsylvania. The battle raged with fury, and death held high carnival. The 47th Virginia captured a battery and turned the guns on the enemy, and following up this success, captured Major-General McCall. The enemy fought with great desperation and gallantry. Featherstone's brigade was driven back in disorder, and Samuel McGowan, with the 14th South Carolina, came to their rescue with unsurpassed gallantry. On the right, two of our brigades were being repulsed, when Archer, in his shirt sleeves, at the head of his brigade, went in with the Confederate yell. Night was throwing its mantle over this scene of death and carnage, when Gen. J. R. Anderson, with his Georgia brigade, was ordered in, and forming two regiments in line on each side of the road, received the enemy's fire at seventy paces, and then engaged
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