Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for McGowan or search for McGowan in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Annual reunion of Pegram Battalion Association in the Hall of House of Delegates, Richmond, Va., May 21st, 1886. (search)
oon after the troops had become hotly engaged, Pegram opened Brander's and Ellett's guns and then rode forward with the infantry in the charge with an eye to pushing forward his artillery should occasion offer. The brunt of the fighting fell on McGowan's veteran South Carolina brigade, the enemy making a most determined stand in a skirt of pines immediately in McGowan's front. This little brigade, largely outnumbered (as the official reports prove), pushed the enemy slowly, but steadily, thrMcGowan's front. This little brigade, largely outnumbered (as the official reports prove), pushed the enemy slowly, but steadily, through the pines to an open field beyond. Suddenly the Federals, who were evidently handled by some resolute officer, put in two fresh brigades. The South Carolina brigade, in turn, was being pushed back slowly, stubbornly disputing every foot of ground, when Pegram, spurring through the line-of-battle, snatched the battle-flag from the color-bearer and rode with it straight towards the enemy. When forty or fifty yards in advance of the whole line, placing the color-staff on his stirrup and tu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 14. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The campaign from the Wilderness to Petersburg—Address of Colonel C. S Venable (formerly of General R. E. Lee's staff), of the University of Virginia, before the Virginia division f the Army of Northern Virginia, at their annual meeting, held in the Virginia State Capitol, at Richmond, Thursday , October 30th, 1873. (search)
d, and at an early hour a portion of Gordon's men were set to work to make a strong entrenched line, about three hundred yards in rear of the captured salient, in order thus to render its occupation of no advantage to the foe. The Sixth corps was sent by General Grant about 6 A. M., to reinforce Hancock, and somewhat later he sent two divisions of Warren's corps. General Lee sent to the assistance of General Rodes, on whose front the confined battle raged, three brigades during the day—McGowan's South Carolina brigade, Perrin's Alabama brigade and Harris's brigade of Mississippians. Now, Rodes's division at the beginning of the campaign was about six thousand five hundred muskets, and it had already done some heavy fighting in the Wilder ness and on the Spotsylvania lines. The brigades sent to his assistance did not number twenty-five hundred men. So that Rodes, with less than ten thousand men, kept back for eighteen hours more than one half of General Grant's infantry, support