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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 131 9 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 19 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 18 4 Browse Search
D. H. Hill, Jr., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 4, North Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 17 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert 8 0 Browse Search
A Roster of General Officers , Heads of Departments, Senators, Representatives , Military Organizations, &c., &c., in Confederate Service during the War between the States. (ed. Charles C. Jones, Jr. Late Lieut. Colonel of Artillery, C. S. A.) 7 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 4 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 12. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Samuel McGowan or search for Samuel McGowan in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 5 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The career of Wise's Brigade, 1861-5. (search)
, where it stood and fought to within thirty paces of the enemy's artillery until thrice ordered to retreat. We fell back again to the parapet at Hatcher's Run, rested the 30th there, and on the 31st again were ordered to fall in on the left of McGowan's Brigade and charge the enemy. The 59th were left to guard the trenches, and the 26th, 34th and 46th went into the charge. They, with McGowan's Brigade, did good execution in staggering the overpowering columns of Meade, and in delaying theirMcGowan's Brigade, did good execution in staggering the overpowering columns of Meade, and in delaying their advance to Five Forks. In these two fights a number of the best and bravest fell among the killed and wounded, among whom were Lieutenant-Colonel Harrison, of the 34th; Captain Barksdale, of the 59th, and Lieutenant Barksdale Warwick, of my staff, who died with a smile of the guadia certaminis on his face, struck whilst waving his sword and shouting Charge! Charge! On the night of the 31st we fell back across Hatcher's Run to Sutherland's on the S. S. R. Road and pressed forward after Hu
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Malvern HillJuly 1, 1862. (search)
e musket, and in short the desperate thrusts and parries of life and death encounter proved, indeed, that Greek had met Greek, when the Alabama boys fell upon the sons of Pennsylvania. The battle raged with fury, and death held high carnival. The 47th Virginia captured a battery and turned the guns on the enemy, and following up this success, captured Major-General McCall. The enemy fought with great desperation and gallantry. Featherstone's brigade was driven back in disorder, and Samuel McGowan, with the 14th South Carolina, came to their rescue with unsurpassed gallantry. On the right, two of our brigades were being repulsed, when Archer, in his shirt sleeves, at the head of his brigade, went in with the Confederate yell. Night was throwing its mantle over this scene of death and carnage, when Gen. J. R. Anderson, with his Georgia brigade, was ordered in, and forming two regiments in line on each side of the road, received the enemy's fire at seventy paces, and then engaged
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ade an attack they were repulsed with heavy loss and several prisoners were captured. The enemy turned the flank at about 4 P. M., and the Southern troops were again compelled to retreat. Cook's, Scales' and McRae's North Carolina Brigades and McGowan's South Carolina Brigade, the troops on the right of the break in the line, formed the corps. The North Carolina Regiments, 13th, 22d, 27th and 40th, were thrown out to check the enemy while the other troops endeavored to cross, hoping to rejoigon-train get ahead for safety, and an attempt was made to throw a temporary bridge across the creek in order to cross. The cavalry had been in the rear guard, and about 2 o'clock they came rushing up and reported that the enemy were pursuing. McGowan's brigade was enabled to cross the bridge, which was not yet completed, but the other troops followed the wagons and crossed at a ford about three miles above the bridges. By this time the enemy were in sight, but no attack was made. The inten
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.39 (search)
nt-General A. P. Hill to advance against him as promptly as possible. General Hill left his camp near Petersburg on the night of the 24th, and marching south halted near Armstrong's Mill, about eight miles from Petersburg. On the morning of the 25th he advanced to Monk's Neck Bridge, three miles from Ream's station, and awaited advice from Hampton. The Confederate force actually present at Ream's station, consisted of Cooke's and MacRae's brigades of Heth's divisions, Lane's, Scales' and McGowan's brigades of Wilcox's division, Anderson's brigade of Longstreet's corps, two brigades of Mahone's division, Butler's and W. H. F. Lee's division of cavalry, and a portion of Pegram's battalion of artillery. Being the central regiment of the brigade, MacRae's line of battle was formed on it, as was customary. Just previous to the assault upon General Hancock's command, the regiment was posted in the edge of a pine thicket, about 300 yards from the breastworks held by the Federal troops
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Index. (search)
6. Knox, Myra E., 323. Lamb, Hon., John, 208. Laughton, Jr., Capt. John E., 347. Lee Camp, No. 1., C. V., 91. Lee, Gen., Fitzhugh, 276. Lee, Gen. G. W. Custis, 38, 286. Lee, Gen. R. E, Surrender of, 300; Birthday of, observed, 354. Lee, Stephen D., 103. Lee, Gen. W. H. F., 277. Leigh, Benj. Watkins, 187. Lewis, R. B., 351. Lincoln, Abraham, 69, 380. Lyons, Capt. J. L., 184. McClellan, Gen. G. B., 154. McCrady, Col., Edward, 237. McDowell, Miss, Lillie, 281. McGowan, Gen., Samuel, 211. Magruder, Gen. J. B., 154, 217. McGuire, Dr., Hunter, 91. McIntire, Adj't D. N., 257. McLaws, Gen Fayette, 101. Mahone, Gen., Wm., 82. McLaughlin, Maj., M. McR., 257. McRae, Col. D. K., 153, 157, 164. McRae, Gen., Wm., 339. McRae, Capt., killed, 257. Malvern Hill, Battle of, 95, 160, 183, 208, 212. Manassas, Battle of, 4. Marshall, Col. E. G., 78. Marigny, Col. M,, 182. Maryland Campaign, The, 226. Mason, Hon. J. M., Tribute to, 186. Maury, Gen. D. H