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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 122 4 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 48 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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re thousands. Well, said Jackson, with his dry smile, you can go. My men can whip any army that comes well provisioned. Of wit, properly speaking, he had little. But at times his brief, wise, matter-of-fact sentences became epigrammatic. Dr. Hunter McGuire, his medical director, once gave him some whiskey when he was wet and fatigued. Jackson made a wry face in swallowing it, and Dr. McGuire asked if it was not good whiskey. Oh, yes, replied Jackson, I like liquor, the taste and effect-thatDr. McGuire asked if it was not good whiskey. Oh, yes, replied Jackson, I like liquor, the taste and effect-that's why I don't drink it. Iii. I have endeavoured to draw an outline of Jackson on horseback --the stiff, gaunt figure, dingy costume, piercing eyes; the large, firm, iron mouth, and the strong fighting-jaw. A few more words upon these personal peculiarities. The soldier's face was one of decided character, but not eminently striking. One circumstance always puzzled me-Jackson's lofty forehead seemed to indicate unmistakably a strong predominance of the imagination and fancy, and a ver
the road and laid under a small tree, where Captain Wilbourn supported his head while his companion went for a surgeon and ambulance to carry him to the rear, receiving strict instructions, however, not to mention the occurrence to any one but Dr. McGuire, or other surgeon. Captain Wilbourn then made an examination of the General's wounds. Removing his fieldglasses and haversack, which latter contained some paper and envelopes for dispatches, and two religious tracts, he put these on his own bing of his wounds with soldierly patience. It was obviously necessary to amputate the arm, and one of his surgeons asked, If we find amputation necessary, General, shall it be done at once? to which he replied with alacrity, Yes, certainly, Dr. McGuire, do for me whatever you think right. The arm was then taken off, and he slept soundly after the operation, and on waking, began to converse about the battle. If I had not been wounded, he said, or had had one hour more of daylight, I would h
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 6: first campaign in the Valley. (search)
t field-guns, from his own village of Lexington, manned chiefly by the gentlemen of the college and town, and commanded by the Rev. Mr. Pendleton, Rector of the Episcopal congregation of that place, formerly a graduate of the West Point Academy, was attached to this brigade, and was usually under Jackson's orders. His brigade staff was composed of Major Frank Jones (who also fell as Major in the 2d regiment, at Gaines' Mill), Adjutant; Lieutenant-Colonel James W. Massie, Aide-de-camp; Dr. Hunter McGuire, Medical Director; Major William Hawkes, Chief Commissary; Major John Harman, Chief Quartermaster; and Lieutenant Alexander S. Pendleton, Ordnance Officer. It is due to the credit of Jackson's wisdom in the selection of his instruments, and to the gallant and devoted men who composed this staff, to add, that all of them who survived, rose with their illustrious leader to corresponding posts of usefulness and distinction. It may be added, that every brigadier who has com.. manded th
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 7: Manassas. (search)
an impatient shake, and wrap his handkerchief around it, but, during the remainder of the action, he took no further notice of it. When he came up, his friend, Dr. McGuire, said, General, are you much hurt? No, replied he; I believe it is a trifle. How goes the day? asked the other. Oh! exclaimed Jackson, with intense elationom one speaker to another, while all, except their chief, concurred in declaring that one finger at least must be removed immediately. Turning to him, he said, Dr. McGuire, what is your opinion? He answered, General, if we attempt to save the finger, the cure will be more painful; but if this were my hand, I should make the experiment. His only reply was to lay the mangled hand in Dr. McGuire's, with a calm and decisive motion, saying, Doctor, then do you dress it. The effort was a successful, though a tedious one, and his hand was restored, after a time, nearly to its original shape and soundness. While he was at this place, the President of the Co
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 16: second Manassa's. (search)
ackson gathered his officers around him in the darkness, at the close of this second act of the tragedy, and prepared to lie down for a short repose under the open sky, their triumph wore a solemn hue. A week of marching and fighting, without any regular supply for their wants, had worn down their energies to a grade where nothing but a determined will could sustain them. Many of the bravest and best had fallen, and the sufferers and the dead were all around them. The Medical Director, Doctor McGuire, recounting the many casualties which he had witnessed, said, General, this day has been won by nothing but stark and stern fighting. No, said Jackson, It has been won by nothing but the blessing and protection of Providence. It was strong evidence of the devout spirit of the patriot troops, that amidst all these fatigues and horrors, they yet found time for acts of devotion. The Chaplains, after spending the day in attentions to the wounded, at nightfall returned to their regiments,
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 18: Fredericksburg. (search)
res of the army forbade his expending time in the indulgence of sorrow. He left his quarters for the last time, cumbered with the thousand wants of his great command, while the child lay dying. His sympathy with the bereaved parents was also quickened by his own parental anxieties. It was about this time that his letters brought him news that his own infant daughter, whose face he had never seen, was ill with a threatening disease. He stated the accounts of its symptoms to his friend, Dr. McGuire, in whose medical wisdom he so confided, and asked his advice, that he might write it to his wife. As he closed his inquiries, he said, with a voice quivering with emotion, I do wish that dear child, if it is God's will, to be spared to us. This prayer was answered; and the witnessing of its smiles was the last earthly joy which was assigned to him, as he finished his course. The winter at Moss Neck was also marked by a farther increase of General Jackson's spirituality and Christia
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 19: Chancellorsville. (search)
the vehicle passed the house of Melzi Chancellor, Dr. McGuire met the party. Colonel Pendleton, the faithful afrom the battle. Upon meeting the sad cavalcade, Dr. McGuire obtained a candle, and sprung into the ambulance ir way to the field hospital near Wilderness Run, Dr. McGuire supporting the General as he sat beside him in th answer to his first demand for the assistance of Dr. McGuire, that that officer must be now engaged in his one he did not propose to have him do anything until Dr. McGuire arrived, save the necessary precautionary acts. ly made them more determined. About midnight, Dr. McGuire summoned as assistants, Drs. Coleman, Black and Wthat his left arm should be immediately removed. Dr. McGuire now explained to him that it seemed necessary to ork. Chloroform was administered by Dr. Coleman; Dr. McGuire, with a steady and deliberate hand, severed the mconscious, saying with a placid and dreamy voice: Dr. McGuire; I am lying very comfortably. The ball was also
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson, Chapter 20: death and burial. (search)
e to Guinea's Station as soon as possible. Dr. McGuire therefore determined to attempt the journeyce for his comfort which could be devised. Dr. McGuire took his place within, by his side, while Luld now be placed on his stomach and side. Dr. McGuire consenting to this, the ambulance was arresrestoration to his command, and inquired of Dr. McGuire, how many weeks would probably elapse beforr his enfeebled system. Wednesday evening, Dr. McGuire, who had scarcely permitted himself to sleeed Him The Almighty. He also insisted that Dr. McGuire should be called in, and the appeal be made on the afternoon of this day that he asked Dr. McGuire whether he supposed the diseased persons hested him to go on, and Smith, encouraged by Dr. McGuire, proceeded to explain how the Apostles wereted, which he made to his medical director, Dr. McGuire. His care for his wounded and sick has beejor Wm. Hawks. The Medical Director was Dr. Hunter McGuire. These four served under Jackson during
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 9: Malvern Hill and the effect of the Seven Days battles (search)
o did not entertain the gloomiest forebodings, and I recall hearing at the time, or rather a day or so afterwards, substantially the same story of that one which within the last few years and a short time before his own death was related by Dr. Hunter McGuire, Jackson's medical director, a man whom of all men he loved and trusted next after his great chief, Robert Lee. I quote from an address first delivered by Doctor McGuire at Lexington, but repeated several times afterwards by special requestDoctor McGuire at Lexington, but repeated several times afterwards by special request: At Malvern Hill, when a portion of our army was beaten and to some extent demoralized, Hill and Ewell and Early came to tell him that they could make no resistance if McClellan attacked them in the morning. It was difficult to wake General Jackson, as he was exhausted and very sound asleep. I tried it myself, and after many efforts, partly succeeded. When he was made to understand what was wanted he said: McClellan and his army will be gone by daylight, and went to sleep again. The gen
Robert Stiles, Four years under Marse Robert, Chapter 18: Campaign of 1864-the Wilderness (search)
d any objection to telling me his orders, and he answered briskly, No, sir; none at all-just the orders I like — to go right down the plank road and strike the enemy wherever I find him. It is glory enough for any man to have been Stonewall Jackson's trusted lieutenant. Ewell simply worshiped his great commander; indeed, it was this worship that led him to the highest. He worshiped Jackson, and yet they were not exactly kindred spirits. The following little story, which I quote from Dr. McGuire, but which I heard many times before reading it in print, well illustrates one of the points of difference between them. At the battle of Port Republic an officer commanding a regiment of Federal soldiers and riding a snow-white horse was very conspicuous for his gallantry. He frequently exposed himself to the fire of our men in the most reckless way. So splendid was this man's courage that General Ewell, one of the most chivalrous gentlemen I ever knew, at some risk to his own life
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