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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 122 4 Browse Search
Robert Lewis Dabney, Life and Commands of Lieutenand- General Thomas J. Jackson 48 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 39 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 22 2 Browse Search
Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 16 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 30. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 4 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 27. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 26. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 12 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 11 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Hunter McGuire or search for Hunter McGuire in all documents.

Your search returned 6 results in 4 document sections:

Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Winchester and Fisher's Hill — letter from General Early to General Lee. (search)
as it was the only place where a stand could be made, and I was compelled to detach Fitz. Lee's cavalry to the Luray valley to hold the enemy's cavalry in check should it advance up that valley. The enemy's loss at Winchester was very heavy. Dr. McGuire has received a letter from a member of his family, who states that 5,800 of the enemy's wounded were brought to the hospital at Winchester, and that the total wounded was between 6,000 and 7,000, and a gentleman who passed over the field says that the number of killed was very large. Sheridan's Medical Director informed one of our Surgeons, left at Woodstock, that the number of wounded in hospital at Winchester was the same as stated in the letter to Dr. McGuire, and I am satisfied from what I saw that the enemy's loss was very heavy. The enemy's infantry force was nearly, if not quite, three times as large as mine, and his cavalry was very much superior, both in numbers and equipment. This I have learned from intelligent perso
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Notes on Ewell's division in the campaign of 1862. (search)
them to remember all the Colonels or commanding officers of these regiments. Colonel Douglas of the Thirteenth, and Colonel Stiles of the Sixtieth, I know. At Bristoe Station on Tuesday, the enemy admit a loss of fifty killed and two hundred wounded. Our loss was not nearly half of these numbers. Lieutenant Turner, General Ewell's aid, had a horse killed under him. At Manassas on Thursday evening, General Ewell was shot when the fight was nearly over. Next day his leg was amputated by Dr. McGuire. Next day General Trimble was wounded in the leg by an explosive ball, and Lieutenant-Colonel Fulton, Twenty-first North Carolina, the only field officer present, having been wounded the day before, the command of the brigade fell to Captain Feagan, of the Fifteenth Alabama. Colonel Forno, Fifth and Colonel York, Fourteenth Louisiana, having been wounded on Friday, Colonel Henry Strong, Sixth Louisiana, was left in command of the brigade. In Lawton's brigade Majors Berry and Griffin wer
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Ewell's report of the Pennsylvania campaign. (search)
Major (now Lieutenant-Colonel A. S. Pendleton), chief of staff, Major Campbell Brown, A. A. G., Lieutenant T. T. Turner, A. D. C., Lieutenant James P. Smith, A. D. C., Colonel A. Smead and Major B. H. Greene, Assistant Inspectors General; Surgeon Hunter McGuire, Medical Director; Major J. A. Harman, Chief Quartermaster; Major W. J. Hawks, Chief Commissary of Subsistence; Major William Allan, Chief of Ordnance; Captain R. E. Wilbourn, Chief of Signals; Captain H. B. Richardson, Chief Engineer; Caenant R. W. B. Elliott, of General Lawton's staff, were with me as volunteer aides-de-camp. Colonel Pendleton's knowledge of his duties, experience and activity relieved me of much hard work. I felt sure that the medical department under Surgeon McGuire, the Quartermaster's under Major Harman, and the Subsistence under Major Hawks, would be as well conducted as experience, energy and zeal could ensure. The labor and responsibility of providing the subsistence of the whole army during its a
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 10. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Battle of Johnsonville. (search)
iam Dean, teamster. Pompey Shoat, teamster. William Buchanan, teamster. Privates. Allen, Wm.; Bradshaw, Ed.; Brothers, J. K. P.; Burton, J. M.; Brigance, Jas.; Burchett, Crocker J.; Caldwell, James; Carr, John H.; Cloud, Wm. R.; Crossland, M. T.; Denny, J. P.; Dodson, Andrew; Drawn, Chas.; Duffie, George; Fitzpatrick, Garrett; Gains, M. M.; Geice, Geo.; Griffin, T. G.; Haig, John; Hamilton, Sam.: Hammel, J. M.; Hanner, A.: Johnson, Tyler; Jones, Jerry; Lanier, Wm.; McBurney, W.; McGuire, Jas.; McKenney, G.; Miles, W. P.; Mitchell, J. N.; Moore, F. A.; Morrison, J. B.; Moss, John; McDonald, J. L.; Moran, Wm., wounded at Price's X roads, but refused to leave his gun, killed at blockhouse near Baker's, on N. and C. railroad; Nepper, J. C.; Peel, Thos.; Priddy, M. C.; Prout, Josh; Prout, George; Powell, George; Reed, R. D.; Robinson, George; Sanders, Jas. L.; Scott, G. H.; Scott, J. M.; Siegel, Chas.; Smith, S. F.; Skeggs, Eugene; Southerland, Wm.; Stucker, Wm. G.; Summer, T.