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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for McIlhenny or search for McIlhenny in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
of that river there stood in its ranks forty-five barefooted and half-clad men. Mobile is threatened and we go to her defence, joining again our Louisiana brigade. They were to capture the first enemy's battery met that the Washington Artillery may be refitted. In Spanish Fort we stood a siege for fourteen days in gallant style, and were the last to spike our guns that night of evacuation. Rescued from out the sea marsh of Perdido river, the Fifth Company is in Mobile again, where McIlhenny and Miller had preceded them to be buried. This siege has fitly crowned our military prescience. The town is doomed. We march away as light artillery, refitted and complete. The end has come when Lee's surrender is announced. Our own soon follows. We furl our flag in tears, and Slocomb leads us home to weeping households, desolated firesides, and ruined estates. Such is the hurried report of the services of the Fifth Company in their performance. Soldiers never showed more cou
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), The Washington Artillery in the Army of Tennessee. (search)
of that river there stood in its ranks forty-five barefooted and half-clad men. Mobile is threatened and we go to her defence, joining again our Louisiana brigade. They were to capture the first enemy's battery met that the Washington Artillery may be refitted. In Spanish Fort we stood a siege for fourteen days in gallant style, and were the last to spike our guns that night of evacuation. Rescued from out the sea marsh of Perdido river, the Fifth Company is in Mobile again, where McIlhenny and Miller had preceded them to be buried. This siege has fitly crowned our military prescience. The town is doomed. We march away as light artillery, refitted and complete. The end has come when Lee's surrender is announced. Our own soon follows. We furl our flag in tears, and Slocomb leads us home to weeping households, desolated firesides, and ruined estates. Such is the hurried report of the services of the Fifth Company in their performance. Soldiers never showed more cou