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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1. 37 3 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 31 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 14 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: January 15, 1862., [Electronic resource] 11 1 Browse Search
Judith White McGuire, Diary of a southern refugee during the war, by a lady of Virginia 9 1 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Col. O. M. Roberts, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.1, Texas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 7 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 6 0 Browse Search
William F. Fox, Lt. Col. U. S. V., Regimental Losses in the American Civil War, 1861-1865: A Treatise on the extent and nature of the mortuary losses in the Union regiments, with full and exhaustive statistics compiled from the official records on file in the state military bureaus and at Washington 5 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 10: The Armies and the Leaders. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The first year of the War in Missouri. (search)
ill's regiment and Woodruff's battery, both from Arkansas. His left was met and driven back by McIntosh with a part of McCulloch's brigade (the Third Louisiana and McIntosh's regiment). McCulloch theMcIntosh's regiment). McCulloch then took some companies of the Third Louisiana and parts of other commands, and with them attacked and routed Sigel (who had been sent to attack the rear), capturing five of his guns. This done, Pearcence county, Missouri, with a mixed command of whites and Indians estimated at 7000 men; ordered McIntosh to report to Price at Springfield with McCulloch's infantry; ordered McCulloch to Pocahontas wiion, their forces united and offering battle. The Confederates soon learned that McCulloch and McIntosh had been killed the day before and their force routed and dispersed. The battle was renewed nemissing. Van Dorn's were probably greater, and he lost heavily in good officers. McCulloch and McIntosh were killed; General Price was again wounded and narrowly escaped death; General W. Y. Slack, w
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Wilson's Creek, and the death of Lyon. (search)
tery, and Steele's battalion. Later, the 1st Kansas was relieved by the 1st Iowa (800), and the 1st Missouri by the 2d Kansas (600), and by Steele. This brought the Union strength at this point up to 3550. Meanwhile, Hibert's 3d Louisiana and McIntosh's regiment and McRae's battalion, together numbering 1320, moved down from their encampment (marked McCulloch's brigade ), crossed the road, and repulsed Plummer's 300 in the corn-field, but were driven back by DuBois's battery. By this hour (8r attack. Price's command consisted of five bodies of Missourians, under Slack, Clark, Parsons, McBride, and Rains, the last-named being encamped farther up the stream. On the bluffs on the east side of the creek were Hebert's 3d Louisiana and McIntosh's Arkansas regiment, and, farther south, Pearce's brigade and two batteries, while other troops, under Greer, Churchill, and Major, were in the valley along the Fayetteville road, holding the extreme of the Confederate position. Lyon put his
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Arkansas troops in the battle of Wilson's Creek. (search)
reer's Texas regiment (mounted); Churchill's Arkansas cavalry, and McIntosh's battalion of Arkansas mounted rifles (Lieutenant-Colonel Embry),McCulloch had been properly published by his adjutant-general, Colonel McIntosh, the camp was thrown into a ferment of suppressed excitement. divisions, under the separate commands of General Price, Adjutant-General McIntosh, and myself. The scene of preparation, immediately folloyon. He had posted the 3d Louisiana Infantry (Colonel Hebert) and McIntosh's 2d Arkansas Rifles (dismounted) to meet the earliest demonstratiounted Rifles (dismounted), all under the immediate command of Colonel McIntosh, effectually charged and drove back the enemy. Simultaneouslyto the weakened line at a critical moment and winning the day. Colonel McIntosh came to me from General McCulloch, and Captain Greene from Genkened an enthusiasm which, no doubt, helped to win the fight. Colonel McIntosh, with two pieces of Reid's battery, and with a part of Dockery
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The Pea Ridge campaign. (search)
7 miles beyond Bentonville, and within 1 or 2 miles of the strongly intrenched camp of the enemy. Van Dorn then ascertained, in a conference with McCulloch and McIntosh, that by making a detour of eight miles he could outflank our position on Sugar Creek, and reach the Telegraph road in our rear, which movement he commenced soonJeff. C. Davis's division on the right of Osterhaus, and its energetic advance, turned a very critical moment into a decisive victory of our arms. McCulloch and McIntosh fell while leading their troops in a furious attack against Osterhaus and Davis. Hebert and a number of his officers and men were captured by pickets of the 36tfires, one about midway between Elkhorn Tavern and Leetown, and the other four or five miles farther off in the direction of Bentonville. This, in Brigadier-General James McIntosh. From a photograph. connection with what we had seen during the afternoon, when some of the enemy's troops were moving along the heights of Pea Ridg
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Union and Confederate Indians in the civil War. (search)
er. When the Confederate agents first approached the full-blood leaders of the Cherokee and Creek tribes on the subject of severing their relations with the United States, the Indians expressed themselves cautiously but decidedly as preferring to remain neutral. Conspicuous among those who took a decided stand against organizing the Indians to oppose the Federal Government was Hopoeithleyohola, the old chief of the Creek tribe. The Confederate agents had succeeded in winning over ex-Chief McIntosh, by appointing him colonel, but, perhaps, two-thirds of the people preferred to be guided by the advice of their venerable old chief, Hopoeithleyohola. In the fall of 1861, Colonel Douglas H. Cooper, commanding the department of Indian operations under authority from the Confederate Government, made several ineffectual efforts to have a conference with the old chief for the purpose of effecting a peaceful settlement of the difficulties that were dividing the nation into two hostile
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., The opposing forces at Pea Ridge, Ark. (search)
cy, and Stemmons; Bledsoe's battery, and Shelby's company of cavalry. Division loss: k, 2; w, 26 = 28. McCulloch's division, Brig.-Gen. Ben. McCulloch (k), Col. E. Greer. Infantry Brigade, Col. Louis Hebert (c), Col. Evander McNair: 4th Ark., Col. Evander McNair, Lieut.-Col. Samuel Ogden; 14th Ark., Col. M. C. Mitchell; 16th Ark., Col. J. F. Hill; 17th Ark., Col. F. A. Rector; 21st Ark., Col. D. McRae; 3d Louisiana, Major W. F. Tunnard (c), Capt. W. S. Gunnell. Cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James McIntosh (k): 1st Ark. Mounted Rifles, Col. J. T. Churchill; 2d Ark. Mounted Rifles, Col. B. T. Embry; 3d Texas, Col. E. Greer, Lieut.-Col. Walter P. Lane; 4th Texas, Col. Wm. B. Sims (w), Lieut.-Col. William Quayle; 6th Texas, Col. B. W. Stone; 11th Texas, Lieut.-Col. James J. Dimond. Artillery: Hart's, Provence's, Gaines's, and Good's batteries. Pikers command, Brig.-Gen. Albert Pike. Cherokee Regiment, Col. Stand Watie; Cherokee Regiment, Col. John Drew; Creek Regiment, Col. D. N. Mc
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: The Opening Battles. Volume 1., Composition and losses of the Confederate army. (search)
cy, and Stemmons; Bledsoe's battery, and Shelby's company of cavalry. Division loss: k, 2; w, 26 = 28. McCulloch's division, Brig.-Gen. Ben. McCulloch (k), Col. E. Greer. Infantry Brigade, Col. Louis Hebert (c), Col. Evander McNair: 4th Ark., Col. Evander McNair, Lieut.-Col. Samuel Ogden; 14th Ark., Col. M. C. Mitchell; 16th Ark., Col. J. F. Hill; 17th Ark., Col. F. A. Rector; 21st Ark., Col. D. McRae; 3d Louisiana, Major W. F. Tunnard (c), Capt. W. S. Gunnell. Cavalry Brigade, Brig.-Gen. James McIntosh (k): 1st Ark. Mounted Rifles, Col. J. T. Churchill; 2d Ark. Mounted Rifles, Col. B. T. Embry; 3d Texas, Col. E. Greer, Lieut.-Col. Walter P. Lane; 4th Texas, Col. Wm. B. Sims (w), Lieut.-Col. William Quayle; 6th Texas, Col. B. W. Stone; 11th Texas, Lieut.-Col. James J. Dimond. Artillery: Hart's, Provence's, Gaines's, and Good's batteries. Pikers command, Brig.-Gen. Albert Pike. Cherokee Regiment, Col. Stand Watie; Cherokee Regiment, Col. John Drew; Creek Regiment, Col. D. N. Mc
remembered that General McClellan (who had been a friend in the old army of her son-in-law, General McIntosh) was in the city. She drove to his house. Mrs. McClellan expressed great sympathy for her13th, 1862. Our hearts are overwhelmed to-day with our private grief. Our connection, Gen. James McIntosh, has fallen in battle. It was at Pea Ridge, Arkansas, on the 7th, while making a dashingself, in deep humility of soul, why we have been thus blessed, for since our dear W. P. and General McIntosh fell, the one in December, the other in March, we have been singularly blessed. Can this ld at Mr. K's house. The child grew gradually worse, and was dying, when a telegram came to General McIntosh from General Price, Come at once — a battle is imminent. He did not hesitate; the next stefuneral. As it passed under the balcony she called to a passer-by: Whose funeral is that? General McIntosh's, madam. She was at once aroused, and ran to her sister's room in agony. She did what sh
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 6: the Army of the Potomac.--the Trent affair.--capture of Roanoke Island. (search)
arnett Kenna, William Halsted, Joseph Brown, Joseph Irlam, Edward Price, Alexander Mack, William Nichols, John Lawson, Martin Freeman, William Dinsmore, Adam Duncan, Charles Deakin, Cornelius Cronin, William Wells, Hendrick sharp, Walter B. Smith, George Parks, Thomas Hayes, Lebbeus Simkins, Oloff Smith, Alexander H. Truett, Robert Brown, John H. James, Thomas Cripps, John Brazell, James H. Morgan, John Smith, James B. Chandler., William Jones, William Doolen, James Smith, Hugh Hamilton, James McIntosh, William M. Carr, Thomas Atkinson, David Sprowle, Andrew Miller, James Martin, William Phinney, John Smith, Samuel W. Kinnard, Patrick Dougherty, Michael Cassidy, George Taylor,,Louis G. Chaput, James Ward, Daniel Whitfield, John M. Burns, John Edwards, Adam McCulloch, James Sheridan, John E. Jones, William Gardner, John Preston, William Newland, David Naylor, Charles B. Woram, Thomas Kendrick, James S. Roan, tree, Andrew Jones, James Seanor, William C. Connor, Martin Howard, James Talle
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 7: military operations in Missouri, New Mexico, and Eastern Kentucky--capture of Fort Henry. (search)
ilroad, by some men returned from Price's army, assisted by inhabitants along the line of the road, acting by pre-concert. On the 23d, Halleck issued an order, fixing the penalty of death for that crime, and requiring the towns and counties along the line of any railway thus destroyed, to repair the damages and pay the expenses. At about the same time General Price, who had found himself relieved from immediate danger, and encouraged by a promise of re-enforcements from Arkansas, under General McIntosh, concentrated about twelve thousand men at Springfield, where he put his army in comfortable huts, with the intention of remaining all winter, and pushed his picket-guards fifteen or twenty miles northward. This demonstration caused Halleck to concentrate his troops at Lebanon, the capital of Laclede County, northeastward of Springfield, early in February, under the chief command of General (late Colonel) S. R. Curtis. These were composed of the troops of Generals Asboth, Sigel, Davis
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