hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 30 10 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 26 8 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 2. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 24 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 23 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 16 2 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 16 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 28. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 13 1 Browse Search
John Dimitry , A. M., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.1, Louisiana (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 2 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 12 2 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 10 0 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for McIntosh or search for McIntosh in all documents.

Your search returned 17 results in 3 document sections:

tained the Headquarters and tents of McCulloch and McIntosh. Colonel Siegel then took position on their camp t. Hebert's regiment of Louisiana Volunteers, and McIntosh's regiment of Arkansas Mounted Riflemen, were orde engaged the enemy with the regiments deployed. Col. McIntosh dismounted his regiment and the two marched up am the front and right to the rear, with order to Col. McIntosh to bring up the rest. When we arrived near the ssourians, having driven them back. To this point McIntosh's regiment, under Lieut.Col. Embry, and Churchill'ell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while char of my own brigade, Cols. Churchill, Greer, Embry, McIntosh, Hebert, and McRae led their different regiments i during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time at the head of his regiment, and atn regiment was then decimated, and Churchill's and McIntosh's Arkansas regiments suffered most severely. Here
ng the engagement. Hebert's regiment of Louisiana Volunteers, and McIntosh's regiment of Arkansas Mounted Riflemen, were ordered to the fronte left and soon engaged the enemy with the regiments deployed. Col. McIntosh dismounted his regiment and the two marched up abreast to a fenhem rapidly from the front and right to the rear, with order to Col. McIntosh to bring up the rest. When we arrived near the enemy's batterysing upon the Missourians, having driven them back. To this point McIntosh's regiment, under Lieut.Col. Embry, and Churchill's regiment on fod Weaver--all fell while nobly and gallantly doing their duty. Col. McIntosh was slightly wounded by a grape-shot, while charging with the Lers of regiments of my own brigade, Cols. Churchill, Greer, Embry, McIntosh, Hebert, and McRae led their different regiments into action with rvice as an aid during the battle; he was of much use to me. To Col. McIntosh, at one time at the head of his regiment, and at other times in
terrific fire into the enemy's right, while Woodruff's Arkansas battery mowed down his left. At this point of time General McCulloch came up, and directed Slack's division to charge Totten's battery in front, and the Arkansas troops on the right. This was the most terrific storm of grape and musketry ever poured out upon the ranks of any American troops. On both sides the men were mowed down like the ripe harvest before the sickle. My own regiment was then decimated, and Churchill's and McIntosh's Arkansas regiments suffered most severely. Here General Lyon was killed, Totten's battery driven from the heights, and his whole force scattered in flight. This ended the bloody strife of that most bloody day. Never has a greater victory crowned the efforts of liberty and equal rights. The best blood of the land has been poured out to water afresh the tree of liberty. This is only a synopsis of the fight — it is impossible to give you details; I cannot do justice to all the officers a