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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Bayard J. McIntosh or search for Bayard J. McIntosh in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Crutchfield's artillery Brigade. (search)
es E. L. Barie, Jas. C. Bryan. Wounded—Lieutenants Geo. D. Smith, Wm, D. Grant; Sergeant E. C. Wade; Privates Percy Elliott, F. Kreeger, J. Darracott, J. Douglass, J. N. Guerard, T. Kreeger, J. H. Polk, J. H. Butler. Company C, Captain Gilbert C. Rice Commanding: Killed—Captain G. C. Rice; Lieutenant George M. Turner; Sergeant George E. James; Privates B. Abney, Alfred O. Bowne, Jacob Gould, John H. McIntosh, Ed. A. Papy, B. J. Rouse; Corporal W. H. Rice. Wounded—Lieutenants Eugene T. Blois, John R. Dillon; Sergeants F. Ripon Sweat, Bayard J. McIntosh, Chas. R. Maxwell, M. McLean, C. J. Sweat, Albert Folker. Died Since of their Wounds—Company A: Lieutenant Fred A. Tupper; Private B. Green. Company B: Lieutenants George D. Smith, Wm. D. Grant; Sergeant E. C. Wade; Privates Percy Elliott, F. Kreeger, F. N. Guerard. Company C: Lieutenant Eugene T. Blois. The balance of the command were either captured unhurt after the fight, or escaped and were present at the sur
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.27 (search)
ficers of the skirmish corps, about 200 men. Instead of feeling, he charged the enemy and attacked and drove from the road the 6th Vermont, killing and wounding about thirty-five, and holding the road until the enemy recrossed the Rappahannock. After being encamped for about ten days, Hill Corps moved towards Gettysburg, Pender's Division arriving within eight miles of Gettysburg on the morning of the 30th. At 3 A. M., July 1st, the command took up line of march, Pender's Division with McIntosh's Battalion of Artillery following Heth and Pegram's Battalion of Artillery. The field arrangement put Scales' brigade on the extreme left of the division, and the 38th North Carolina on the left of the brigade, its left resting on the Chambersburg pike. The advance of the enemy was driven back to the hills where their forces were to oppose the advance of the Confederates. At the first charge Pender's Division was in the rear, Scales' and Thomas' brigades being on the right. The enemy o
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 25. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
and inaccuracies may occur. This company was organized as an infantry company, owing to the want of artillery equipments at the time, and served as Company B of the 52nd Virginia Regiment, then under Colonel Baldwin, and was a part of General Ed. Johnson's Brigade, doing service on Alleghany and Shenandoah mountains until the fall of 1861, when it was made an artillery company, and was attached to the same brigade till the artillery was made a separate command. After this it was a part of McIntosh's battalion, in General A. P. Hill's corps, until the close of the war. It was mustered into service as the McDowell Guard in honor of Miss Lillie McDowell, then of Lexington, Va., a daughter of Governor James McDowell, now Mrs. E. P. McD. Wolff, of Georgia, who made the company a present of a pair of horses, harness and ambulance, besides furnishing a considerable amount of means for clothing equipment of the company. She also paid a bounty to a young man who was under military age, t