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Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 28 2 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for David Gregg McIntosh or search for David Gregg McIntosh in all documents.

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The Confederate artillery—its organization and development David Gregg McIntosh, Colonel of Artillery, Confederate States Army The largest Confederate gun at Yorktown — a 64-Pounder burst in the effort to reach Federal battery no. 1 in McClellan's works before the beleaguered Confederate city The organization of the Confederate field-artillery during the Civil War was never as symmetrical as that of the cavalry and infantry, and its evolution was slow. This was due in part to 41 rifles,26 Napoleons,15 howitzers= 82in the 3d Corps Total247  The particular equipment in the battalions of the Third Corps was as follows: Cutts:10 rifles,3 Napoleons,4 howitzers= 17 Garnett:11 rifles,4 Napoleons,2 howitzers= 17 McIntosh:10 rifles,6 Napoleons, = 16 Pegram:8 rifles,9 Napoleons,24 howitzers = 19 Cutshaw:2 rifles,5 Napoleons,74 howitzers= 14 After the battle of Chattanooga-captured Confederate guns The Confederate artillery was never equal in number or wei<