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Harper's Encyclopedia of United States History (ed. Benson Lossing) 48 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Thomas McKean or search for Thomas McKean in all documents.

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of April, was immediately despatched to New York for necessary repairs, before proceeding off Charleston harbor, whither her energetic commander was directed and promptly repaired, to prevent illegal commerce from that port. In the mean time, information reached the Department of large shipments of arms and munitions of war in Europe, destined for New Orleans and Mobile. Believing it of primary importance that this shipment should, if possible, be intercepted, and its landing prevented, Capt. McKean was directed to proceed to the Gulf for that purpose; and the Harriet Lane was ordered to Charleston, to take the place of the Niagara before that port. Flag-officer Mervine left Boston in the Mississippi in advance of his flag-ship, the Colorado, and arrived in the Gulf on the 8th of June. Previous to his arrival, an embargo or blockade of the Mississippi River, and some of the principal ports on the Gulf, had been commenced, and has been since vigorously maintained and enforced.
The departure of the prisoners was committed to the care of Colonel Jacob Morgan, of Bucks County, and they were guarded by six of the light-horse, commanded by Alexander Nesbitt and Samuel Caldwell, who were to obey the despatches from the Board of War, of which General Horatio Gates was President, directed to the lieutenants of the counties through which the prisoners were to pass. The writs of habeas corpus, on being presented to the Chief Justice, were marked by him, Allowed by Thomas McKean, and they were served on the officers who had the prisononers in custody, when they had been taken on their journey as far as Reading, Pennsylvania, on the 14th day of September, but the officers refused to obey them. It appears by the Journal of the Supreme Executive Council of the 16th of September, that Alexander Nesbitt, one of the officers, had previously obtained information about the writs, and made a report of them; when the Pennsylvania Legislature, at the instance of the Su