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Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 11: eighty years 1899-1900; aet. 80-81 (search)
to a box, in which we first recognized Mrs. Howe, sitting with the Misses Wheeler. You should have heard the yell. We could see the splendid white head trembling; then her voice joined in, as Whitney sang, in the beauty of the lilies, and by the time he had reached the words,-- as he died to make men holy, let us die to make men free, the whole vast audience was on its feet, sobbing and singing at the top of its thousands of lungs. If volunteers were really needed for the Philippines, McKinley could have had us all right there. the same evening she went to Unitarian meeting in Tremont Temple, where read my screed about Governor Andrew, which has cost me some work and more anxiety. Rev. S. A. Eliot, whom I saw for the first time, was charmingly handsome and friendly. I was introduced as Saint Julia and the whole audience rose when I came forward to read. Item: I had dropped my bag with my manuscript in the carriage, but Charles fox telephoned to the stable and got it for me
Laura E. Richards, Maud Howe, Florence Howe Hall, Julia Ward Howe, 1819-1910, in two volumes, with portraits and other illustrations: volume 1, Chapter 12: Stepping westward 1901-1902; aet. 82-83 (search)
the beautiful morning meeting and specially of the truth which comes down to us, mixed with so much rubbish of tradition. I spoke of the power of truth which burns all this accumulation of superstition and shines out firm and clear, so we may say that the myth crumbles but the majesty remains. She managed to do a good deal of writing this summer: wrote a number of screeds, some to order, some from inward leading: e.g., a paper on Girlhood seventy years ago, a poem on the death of President McKinley. October 5. A package came to-day from McClure's Syndicate. I thought it was my manuscript returned and rejected, and said, God give me strength not to cry. I opened it and found a typewritten copy of my paper on Girlhood, sent to me for correction in lieu of printer's proof. Wrote a little on my screed about Anarchy. Had a sudden thought that the sense and spirit of government is responsibility. October 6.... Wrote a poem on The Dead Century, which has in it some good lines
ck, II, 364. Lyons, I, 191. Mabilleau, M., II, 314. McAllister, Julia, II, 34. McAllister, Louisa, I, 42, 158, 230. McAllister, M. H., I, 42. McAlvin, Miss, II, 194. McCabe, C. C., I, 188, 189. McCarthy, Frank, II, 61, 62. McCarthy, Justin, II, 8. McCarthy, Mrs., Justin, II, 5. McCready, Tom, II, 295. McCreary, Mrs., II, 250. McDonald, Alexander, I, 167. McGregor, Fanny, I, 201. Machiavelli, Niccolo, I, 275. McKaye, Baron, I, 258, 267. McKinley, William, II, 265, 290. McLaren, Eva, II, 166. MacMahon, M. E. P. M. de, II, 26. Macready, W. C., I, 87. McTavish, Mrs., II, 249. Madrid, I, 328; II, 243, 353. Maggi, Count, Alberto, I, 255. Mailliard, Adolphe, I, 117, 135; II, 222. Mailliard, Annie, I, 18, 21, 30, 34-36, 54, 58, 60, 78-81, 83-85, 93, 117, 134, 135, 137, 157, 200, 240, 241; II, 67, 94, 131, 135, 155, 202, 203, 216, 235. Letters to, 107-09, 117, 118, 122-25, 127, 131-33, 137, 142, 159-62, 164-72, 184.