Browsing named entities in Colonel William Preston Johnston, The Life of General Albert Sidney Johnston : His Service in the Armies of the United States, the Republic of Texas, and the Confederate States.. You can also browse the collection for Hugh McLeod or search for Hugh McLeod in all documents.

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ions at that time. A little later, if he had chosen to give expression to them, they would have been more emphatic in tone. On the 20th of January the Secretary of War, Barnard E. Bee, remarks in a friendly letter, that it would be useless to get men together without supplies; and adds, The nakedness of the land you will be struck with. On the 27th of January he informs General Johnston that the President is opposed to his making his headquarters beyond San Antonio. On February 26th H. McLeod writes very emphatically, The President will not change the frontier line, or reinforce General Johnston with militia. On the same day the Secretary of War writes, As we have not a dollar in the Treasury, we must be content to fold our arms; and again, on another occasion, he says: The Treasury is drained. Not a dollar is to be had. As the winter and spring dragged on, it became evident that Mexico, busied with her own civil wars, would not attempt the conquest of Texas, but would lim
no response came, and our troops moved forward. In the rough draft of the report of the commissioners, part of which is now in the writer's possession, it is stated that on the morning of the 9th of July they dispatched from Kickapoo Town Colonel McLeod, John N. Hensford, Jacob Snively, David Rusk, Colonel Len Williams, Moses L. Patton, and — Robinson, with a communication to Bowles. The party was directed to carry a white flag and proceed to the Indian camp, fifteen or twenty miles distanwas also told not to give presents or pay any ransom, which only encouraged the Comanches to renewed depredations. Colonel Fisher conveyed his warning to them in February, 1840, on which they agreed to bring in their prisoners, and talk. Colonel Hugh McLeod and Colonel William G. Cooke were appointed commissioners to assist Fisher at the meeting; and Captain Thomas Howard, with five companies of rangers, was sent to protect the commissioners. The narrative herein given of the occurrences