hide Matching Documents

The documents where this entity occurs most often are shown below. Click on a document to open it.

Document Max. Freq Min. Freq
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
View all matching documents...

Browsing named entities in Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler. You can also browse the collection for McMillan or search for McMillan in all documents.

Your search returned 5 results in 3 document sections:

ses and harnesses, the Thirty-First Massachusetts and the Seventh Vermont Regiments, and Magee's cavalry, with transportation, ammunition, and forage for all. With this force the general will expect you to proceed to Vicksburg with the flag-officer, and then take the town or have it burned at all hazards. You will leave such force as you may judge necessary to hold Baton Rouge. Camp Moore is believed to be broken up substantially, and perhaps you will think a regiment sufficient; Colonel McMillan's is recommended, as he has two pieces of cannon. The flag-officer has distinct instructions to open the river, and will do it, I doubt not. A large force is sent to you with what you have, and sufficient, as it would seem, to take any batteries and the supporting force they may have at Vicksburg. You will often be amused by reports of the enemy's strength. Witness your report of the numbers approaching Baton Rouge. These stories are exaggerated always. You will send up a regimen
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler, Chapter 12: administration of finances, politics, and justice.--recall. (search)
anks that I had intended, as soon as I could spare the regiment from Weitzel, to send the Twenty-First Indiana, which had won such glory at Baton Rouge under Colonel McMillan, down to occupy Galveston, Texas, which was then held by the fleet. I looked upon Colonel McMillan as fit to command the department, and Galveston was a plaColonel McMillan as fit to command the department, and Galveston was a place requiring high qualities in the commander as well as in the soldiers. I also suggested that McMillan's regiment be filled up with soldiers enlisted from other regiments. What distressed me not a little was that Banks' regular officers did not seem to appreciate the necessity of prompt movement. Elsewhere as well as in NeMcMillan's regiment be filled up with soldiers enlisted from other regiments. What distressed me not a little was that Banks' regular officers did not seem to appreciate the necessity of prompt movement. Elsewhere as well as in New Orleans, I had always held my army to be deemed in the field. Then, if they were to have quarters, it would cost the government nothing, for they could occupy the houses deserted by those who were serving in the Confederate army. But Banks' officers were inclined to consider themselves in garrison, for that would enable them to
; despatches between Halleck and, 872-873; sends despatches to Grant, 874; reference to, 893. McCLELLAN'S Own Story, editor of quoted on Halleck, 872. McCABE, Capt., Gordon, quoted upon attack on Petersburg, 701, 702, 703. McCAFFERTY, Hon. M. J., appointed Judge, 975. McCLERNAND, General, letter from Halleck, 460. McCULLOCH, Secretary, financial theories of, 938-939. McDOWELL, General, inexperience previous to Bull Run, 290; inexperience of, 571; reference to, 863. McMILLAN, Colonel, 461; regarded as an able commander, 531. McPHEETUS, Colonel, 496. Meade, General, reference to, 621, 683, 700; letter from Grant to, 636; despatch from, describing attack on Petersburg, 705; reference to, 715-738; order from Grant, 827; orders not obeyed at Petersburg, 831; ordered to Burksville, 876; mentioned for major-general, 878; reference to, 901. Meigs, General, aids Butler, 639; reference to, 666; examines Butler's administration of affairs, 832. Mejan, Count, French