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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for McMillan or search for McMillan in all documents.

Your search returned 7 results in 4 document sections:

to the services of Lieut. Henry H. Elliott, Ninth New-York volunteers, Lieutenant and Acting Assistant Adjutant on General Williams's staff. Of his coolness and intrepidity in action, every officer in the action can bear witness, as also to the still more trying duties of the detail of his official business. I am under deep obligations to him for his cheerful and zealous services for the time I remained in command. I enclose copies of correspondence between myself and Lieut. Elliott. Col. McMillan, of the Twenty-first Indiana, has been unwell for some time. His counsel and advice have been freely offered on every occasion. All of which is respectfully submitted. Thomas W. Cahill, Colonel Commanding at Baton Rouge. Official report of Colonel Dudley. headquarters right wing Second brigade, Department of the Gulf, Baton Rouge, La., August 7, 1862. First Lieut. H. H. Elliott, A. A.A. G., Second Brigade: sir: I have the honor to enclose, for the information of the Comma
g officer of the confederate forces outside of Baton Rouge. This was from Col. Cahill, and disclaimed the right of the officer sending the first. It appears that after Gen. Williams (who was chief in command) was killed, and Colonels Keith and McMillan had fallen, there was a controversy among the Federals as to the ranking officer, but the succession finally devolved on Cahill. One of the most hotly contested points of the field was a graveyard, from which the enemy had poured a galling fis taken into the arsenal building, the window-shutters of which were closed. He was not permitted to see General Clark, but learned that he was still living and well cared for. The enemy acknowledge the loss of Gen. Williams, Colonels Keith and McMillan, and about eight hundred killed and missing. The expedition has not proved a complete success, owing entirely to the Arkansas not having cooperated. Had not that vessel met with an unfortunate accident, the victory would have been one of the
owering force of the enemy for about thirty minutes, our whole line was broken and repulsed, and the men retired in the greatest confusion. I regret to say that, in this battle, Col. Link, of the Twelfth Indiana, was dangerously wounded, and Col. McMillan, of the Ninety-fifth Ohio, was shot in the hand. After passing through Richmond, by your permission I organized a rear-guard of the scattered men of most all regiments that had been in the several battles, and took command myself, for the nd Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twel
owering force of the enemy for about thirty minutes, our whole line was broken and repulsed, and the men retired in the greatest confusion. I regret to say that, in this battle, Col. Link, of the Twelfth Indiana, was dangerously wounded, and Col. McMillan, of the Ninety-fifth Ohio, was shot in the hand. After passing through Richmond, by your permission I organized a rear-guard of the scattered men of most all regiments that had been in the several battles, and took command myself, for the nd Kendrick, of your staff, some of whom had travelled twenty-five miles after hearing the cannonading of the morning, for valuable aid given me during the second and third engagements. Colonels Lucas, Link, Mahan, Korff, Landrum, Oden, Munday, McMillan, Majors Kempton, Orr, Morrison, Captain Baird, Lieut. Lamphere, and Sergeant Brown, of the battery, greatly distinguished themselves during the action, together with other officers whose names I have not got. The enemy say they had about twel