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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 9. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 8 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 11 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore) 8 8 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 4. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Benjamnin F. Butler, Butler's Book: Autobiography and Personal Reminiscences of Major-General Benjamin Butler 6 4 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 5 1 Browse Search
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley 4 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 3 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 2 0 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 2 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley. You can also browse the collection for McMillan or search for McMillan in all documents.

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Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 1.4, chapter 1.8 (search)
; but I was much shocked when I learned that, behind each tablet, was a long narrow cell wherein bodies were corrupting. One of these cells had just been opened, and was destined for the body of my late employer; but, unfortunately for my feelings, not far off lay, huddled in a corner, the relics of mortality which had occupied it previously, and which had been ruthlessly displaced. Within a short time, the store, with all its contents, was disposed of by auction, to Messrs. Ellison and McMillan. Messrs. Kitchen and Richardson departed elsewhere, but I was retained by the new firm. Mrs. Cornelia Speake and her two children removed to Louisville, and I never saw either of them again. About this time there came to Mrs. Williams's boarding-house a blue-eyed and fair-haired lad, of about my own age, seeking lodgings. As the house was full, the landlady insisted on accommodating him in my room, and bedding him with me; and, on finding that the boy was English, and just arrived from
Henry Morton Stanley, Dorothy Stanley, The Autobiography of Sir Henry Morton Stanley, part 2.13, Index (search)
ermanently engaged, 93; his new feeling of independence, 94-96; his affection. for New Orleans, 96; on the moral courage to say No, 96; books read at this period, 97, 98; takes breakfast with Mr. Stanley, 98-100; his acquaintance with the Stanleys, 100, 101; his salary increased, 101; his discovery of a theft in the business house, 102-104; Mr. Stanley's gift of books to, 105; watches the body of Mr. Speake, 105, 106; adventure with Dick (Alice) Heaton, 107-111; discharged from Ellison and McMillan's, 106; his account of the death of Mrs. Stanley, 111-113; attends the captain of the Dido, 114; leaves New Orleans, 115; goes to St. Louis, 115; returns to New Orleans, 116-118; taken under the charge of Mr. Stanley and given his name, 118-125; travels with Mr. Stanley, 125; his mental acquisitiveness and memory, 126; his judgement a thing of growth, 126; studies and reads with Mr. Stanley, 127; profits by the moral instruction of Mr. Stanley, 128-133, 137-139; the religious views taught