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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A. 22 2 Browse Search
Philip Henry Sheridan, Personal Memoirs of P. H. Sheridan, General, United States Army . 6 0 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: February 25, 1865., [Electronic resource] 5 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 2 0 Browse Search
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Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 30: Averill's raid and the winter campaign. (search)
last of December he was ready to move, and started, accompanied by McNeil's company of partisan rangers and Gilmor's Maryland battalion, crosnly artillery there was in the valley. Rosser with his brigade, McNeil's company, a part of Gilmor's battalion, the battery and some wagonforce there, behind the mountain intervening between the two forks, McNeil's company was thrown forward to Moorefield and the North Fork, to orefield on the North Fork, from discovering our presence in force; McNeil's company being composed mainly of men from that section, and beingavoid the defile spoken of and get in its rear, being guided by Captain McNeil with his company. A thick fog overspread the mountains and ucceeded in passing in safety between the columns sent against him. McNeil's company and part of Gilmor's battalion had been sent west to the ounter those of the enemy. The object of this was to enable Captain McNeil to get in rear with his cattle, with which he was coming up on
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Chapter 50: operations in 1865. (search)
een kept in the Valley. Echols' brigade of Wharton's division was subsequently sent to Southwestern Virginia to report to General Echols for special duty, and McNeil's company of partisan rangers, and Woodson's company of unattached Missouri cavalry, were sent to the county of Hardy, Major Harry Gilmor being likewise ordered ts the commander of my advance picket line. The winter was a severe one, and all material operations were suspended until its close. Late in February. Lieutenant Jesse McNeil, who was in command of his father's old company, with forty or fifty men of that company and Woodson's, made a dash into Cumberland, Maryland, at night an performed many daring exploits during the war, and had accompanied me into Maryland, doing good service. When Sheridan was at Harrisonburg in October, 1864, Captain McNeil had burned the bridge at Edinburg in his rear, and had attacked and captured the guard at the bridge at Mount Jackson, but in this affair he received a very s
Jubal Anderson Early, Ruth Hairston Early, Lieutenant General Jubal A. Early , C. S. A., Index. (search)
ral, 60, 76, 132-33, 135- 36-37, 147, 149, 152, 154-55, 158, 163, 194-95, 197, 211-12, 216, 218, 220, 225-26-27, 230-31, 233, 236, 342 McLean's Farm, 6, 12, 16 McLean's Ford, 5, 15, 17, 18, 20, 31, 52, 53 McLean's House, 6, 7, 10, 16 McNeil, Captain, 333-34-35, 337-38, 460 McNeil, Lieutenant, Jesse, 461 McRae, General, 47, 60, 62, 70-71-72 Meade, General (U. S. A.), 267, 271, 275-76-77, 282, 284, 285, 297, 302-03-04-05, 307, 317, 318, 324- 325, 341, 343, 478 Mechanicsville, 76McNeil, Lieutenant, Jesse, 461 McRae, General, 47, 60, 62, 70-71-72 Meade, General (U. S. A.), 267, 271, 275-76-77, 282, 284, 285, 297, 302-03-04-05, 307, 317, 318, 324- 325, 341, 343, 478 Mechanicsville, 76, 361, 362 Meem's Bottom, 454 Merritt's Division (U. S. A.), 457 Merry Oaks, 361 Middle Department, 418, 419 Middle Military Division, 344, 417, 418 Middle Mountain, 331 Middle River, 366, 368 Middle Road, 369, 433, 436 Middletown, 75, 135, 264, 266, 368-69, 386, 397-98, 414, 444, 446, 447, 453 Miles' Division (U. S. A.), 31, 44, 137 Milford, 117, 433, 436, 450, 453 Military Institute, 374, 380 Millboro, 330, 461 Mills' Gap, 284 Millwood, 164, 240, 39
e Early sending his Second Corps to Lee. During the entire campaign I had been annoyed by guerrilla bands under such partisan chiefs as Mosby, White, Gilmore, McNeil, and others, and this had considerably depleted my line-of-battle strength, necessitating as it did large escorts for my supply-trains. The most redoubtable of t but they also operated efficiently against the guerrillas infesting West Virginia. Harry Gilmore, of Maryland, was the most noted of these since the death of McNeil, and as the scouts had reported him in Harrisonburg the latter part of January, I directed two of the most trustworthy to be sent to watch his movements and ascerhad organized at the camp-meeting, most of the men he had recruited returning to their homes discouraged, though some few joined the bands of Woodson and young Jesse McNeil, which, led by the latter, dashed into Cumberland, Maryland, at 3 o'clock on the morning of the 21st of February and made a reprisal by carrying off General Cr
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 31. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.10 (search)
ral of West Virginia; the Maryland Battalion, by Major Sturgis Davis, of Maryland, who had won his laurels under Turner Ashby; Gilmor's Battalion of Rangers, by Harry Gilmor, of Baltimore, who was as rough and daring a rider as ever drew a saber; McNeil's Rangers, of Hardy and Hampshire counties, West Virginia, commanded by Captain John H. Mc-Neil. This was the company that later in the war, under the immediate command of Jesse McNeil, son of Captain J. H. McNeil, first lieutenant of Company D,Jesse McNeil, son of Captain J. H. McNeil, first lieutenant of Company D, rode into Cumberland, Md., and brought out two major-generals, Crook and Kelly, from the very midst of their commands. Finally, McClanahan's Battery, commanded by Captain John H. McClanahan, a Texan, who had served under Ben McCullough in Texas until it got too peaceable there for him. So, as may be seen, our General had in his brigade a lot of choice spirits, and was well equipped to make a daring raid into the enemy's lines. The writer had the honor to command a section of McClanahan's
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 34. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.32 (search)
one what? I flopped that big fellow from his horse that was coming after us so savage. Sheffee was a green mountain boy, but knew how to shoot, and when Colonel Kelly came wallop to the ground all effort to pursue the Virginians just then stopped, and this break in the charge gave them time to get together and defend themselves. This Col. B. F. Kelly is the same man who became a major-general in the Federal army, and was captured the last winter of the war in Cumberland City, Md., by Jesse McNeil. Major-General George Crook was captured at the same time by Mc-Neil. Tells of the attack. From Dr. Price's diary the following explanation is given or the attack on Philippi: Saturday was the first day of June, 1861. On the second clay of June there was an open-air preaching service for the Virginia soldiers in Philippi. At the conclusion of the service two young ladies, a Miss Mollie Kerr and a Miss Mollie McLeod. rode hurriedly into Philippi on horseback, and asked at on
ived at the War Department last night: "Headquarters, February 24, 1865. "Hon. J. C. Breckinridge, Secretary of War: "General Early reports that Lieutenant McNeil, with thirty men, on the morning of the 21st, entered Cumberland, captured and brought out Generals Crook and Kelly, the adjutant- general of the department, two privates and the headquarters flag, without firing a gun, though a considerable force is stationed in the vicinity. "Lieutenant McNeil and party deserve much credit for this bold exploit. "Their prisoners will reach Staunton to-day. "R. E. Lee." Another account. The following telegram was received yesterdayer Melvin, of General Crook's staff, are here, en route for Richmond. They were captured in Cumberland, Maryland, last Tuesday morning at 3 o'clock, by Lieutenant Jesse McNeil and forty- five of his men, and fifteen of General Rosser's furloughed men.--They will reach your city by the cars on the Central railroad to-morrow."