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the forces of General Duffle, from the Kanawha valley, at Lewisburgh, on the seventh, two days hence. We, therefore, went into camp in the morning on the farm of McNeil, who had a son a captain in the rebel army, and uncle to the McNeil who infests the country about Moorfield, in Hardy County. Here we found plenty of corn, oatere among friends; and from here to New-Creek there is a large proportion of Union men. We arrived at Petersburgh, and enjoyed a two days rest. This morning McNeil and White, with three hundred guerrillas, attacked a train of ninety wagons, which were on the way from New-Creek to Petersburgh. They killed two of the guards, start, and with their knowledge of the country, but a slight prospect of overtaking them. This evening we camped on the farm of Mrs. Williams, who has a son with McNeil, and she, with her daughters, are bitter secesh. But we found corn and hay in abundance, and that was what our horses needed, so we used it. The morning of th
ssage without again adverting to the savage ferocity which still marks the conduct of the enemy in the prosecution of the war. After their repulse from the defences before Charleston, they first sought revenge by an abortive attempt to destroy the city with an incendiary composition, thrown by improved artillery from a distance of four miles. Failing in this, they changed their missiles, but fortunately have thus far succeeded only in killing two women in the city. Their commanders, Butler, McNeil, and Turchin, whose horrible barbarities have made their names widely notorious and everywhere execrable, are still honored and cherished by the authorities at Washington. The first-named, after having been withdrawn from the scenes of his cruelties against women and prisoners of war, (in reluctant concession to the demands of outraged humanity in Europe,) has just been put in a new command at Norfolk, where helpless women and children are again placed at his mercy. Nor has less unrelent
General, could not have pressed lightly, in the recollection of the dastardly outrages upon private property, in the destruction of mills, of the houses of poor, inoffensive people living near his line of march, and in the shameful excess of his wretched mercenaries. We could hardly wish our bitterest enemy a larger portion of misery than must have fallen upon this ambitious aspirant on his return to the fortifications to Vicksburgh. An educated soldier, who had long associated with gentlemen, who had received the highest favors and unbounded kindness and hospitality from the Southern people, during his residence in Louisiana, Sherman has, by the license extended to his brutal hirelings, in their march through Mississippi, and by his own acts of outrage and cruelty, shown a degree of infamy that entitles him to take rank with Butler, McNeil, Hunter, and other Federal chiefs whose only achievements in this war have been those of the ruffian, the pirate, the plunderer and highwayman.