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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 6. (ed. Frank Moore) 61 1 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 41 1 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 37 3 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 31 1 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events, Diary from December 17, 1860 - April 30, 1864 (ed. Frank Moore) 25 1 Browse Search
Col. John M. Harrell, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 10.2, Arkansas (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 18 2 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 1. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 14 0 Browse Search
Wiley Britton, Memoirs of the Rebellion on the Border 1863. 13 3 Browse Search
William H. Herndon, Jesse William Weik, Herndon's Lincoln: The True Story of a Great Life, Etiam in minimis major, The History and Personal Recollections of Abraham Lincoln by William H. Herndon, for twenty years his friend and Jesse William Weik 12 0 Browse Search
John M. Schofield, Forty-six years in the Army 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for John McNeil or search for John McNeil in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 30: (search)
he lustre of that 4th of July made so glorious by the capture of Vicksburg and the victory of Gettysburg. On the 9th of August the Mound City, Lieutenant-Commander Byron Wilson, while at Lake Providence, gave the enemy a severe lesson. Captain John McNeil, C. S. A., notorious raider, made a descent on Lake Providence with some seventy men, for the purpose of carrying off some mules, horses and wagons, a number of the latter having congregated there during the occupation pation of the place by a part of the Federal army. As McNeil's men entered the town the Mound City opened on them with her portbattery and the enemy fled to the woods, leaving seven dead on the field and carrying off many wounded. The enemy never expected to see an ironclad at Lake Providence and never troubled the place again. It was exceedingly difficult to suppress this system of guerilla warfare, but it was finally put an end to by the Navy when the surrender of Vicksburg relieved a large number of gun-b