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George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 1: (search)
ere there; among the rest Caroline Pichler, whom I was very glad to see, for the sake of her fifty volumes of romances, some of which are good, and have been translated into English, French, and Italian. She seemed a nice, pleasant old lady. Mr. McNeill was there, whom I remember to have met in London at dinner last year, recently returned from Persia. . . . . He is now going there again as British Minister. He is a very interesting and intellectual gentleman; moreover, a fine scholar in Wes; but it was in vain the Orientalist told him he knew me very well and moved again towards the door, for the Prince insisted, though merely by his manner, upon hearing there what he had to say. It was simply to ask when he might present to him Mr. McNeill, the British Ambassador to Persia, which the Prince told him he might do the next morning in his cabinet, and then most politely bowed away the somewhat disconcerted scholar. He took me now directly into his cabinet, and seating me in the sam
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), Chapter 9: (search)
more of her hospitality, if our time would have permitted. . . . We had a visit from the Fullertons, and dined at Sir Charles Bell's, the well-known surgeon, and author of one of the Bridgewater Treatises. Lady Bell is quite a delightful person, and must once have been beautiful, for she is still fine-looking; and Sir Charles, though beginning to grow old, is fresh, perfectly preserved, and abounding in pleasant knowledge and accomplishment. Sir William and Lady Hamilton were there; Mrs. McNeill, wife of the British Ambassador to Persia, whom I knew in London and Vienna; and Wilson, who is her brother, and two or three others. I think it was very like a dinner at home. Certainly it was very agreeable; but we stayed much later than we should have done in America, for it is the way here, and was so twenty years ago. April 28.—Our friend Mrs. Alison, Who had been at Edgeworthtown in 1835. . . . . whom we have seen frequently since we have been in Edinburgh, invited us to go
George Ticknor, Life, letters and journals of George Ticknor (ed. George Hillard), chapter 30 (search)
obert J., II. 181. Mackintosh, Sir, James, I. 50, 263, 264, 265, 279, 289, 290, 291, 430; Lady, 290. McClellan, General George B., II. 444, 458. McClellan, Mrs. George B., Il 458. McLane, Louis, I. 409. McLane, Miss, I. 277, 278. McNeill, Mr., I. 417, II. 12, 13. McNeill, Mrs., I. 417, II. 164. Madison. J., President of the United States, I. 29, 30, 34, 53, 110, 346, 347, 409. Madison, Mrs., I. 29, 30, 346, 347. Madraso, Jose de, I. 186 and note. Madrid, visits, I. 185McNeill, Mrs., I. 417, II. 164. Madison. J., President of the United States, I. 29, 30, 34, 53, 110, 346, 347, 409. Madison, Mrs., I. 29, 30, 346, 347. Madraso, Jose de, I. 186 and note. Madrid, visits, I. 185, 186-220; described, 190-214. Mahon, Viscount, I. 258 and note, 292. See Stanhope, Earl. Mai, Monsignor, II. 81 and note, 82, 83. Maidstone, Viscount. II. 80. Maison, Marshal, II. 130, 136. Malaga, I. 233, 234. Malaga, Bishop, I. 234, 235. Malchus, Baron, II. 100. Malibran, Madame, I. 407, 413. Mallett, J. L., II. 274. Maltby, Bishop of Durham, II. 178 Maltby, Mr., I. 58, 413. Malthus, T. R., I. 290. Manchester, Mass., 11. 239 and note, 268. Manchester, (Seven