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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 5. (ed. Frank Moore) 4 4 Browse Search
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War 4 0 Browse Search
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative 2 0 Browse Search
Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies. 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 1 1 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 1: the situation. (search)
rusalem Plank Road. Owing to the casualties among commanders, the action of that day has never been adequately reported. Colonel Powell had no data on which to base a just account of the overture of Forts Sedgwick and Mahone,--surnamed by the performers Fort Hell and Fort Damnation. Glance now at the record of the whole army. Those treated in the field hospitals up to the end of October were officially reported as numbering 57,498, and to the end of December, 68,840. Report of Surgeon McParlin, Medical Director of the Army of the Potomac. Some of these, no doubt were cases of sickness, a no less real casualty; but taking the ratio of one fifth the wounded as indicating the number of the killed outright, we reach a total of 59,000 men killed and wounded in this campaign up to October 31, 1864. This is to take no account of the missing, --a list governed by no law of ratios, but determined by the peculiar circumstances of each battle; always a list sad to contemplate, made up
oughout by skill, courage, and unerring judgment, and worthy of the solid reputation as a soldier he has acquired by many previous years of faithful and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom m is executed. By command of Major-General Pope. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia Bristow station, August 28, 1862, 11 A. M. Surgeon McParlin, Medical Director Army of Virginia: Sir: Major-General Pope directs that you take measures to hunt up the wounded of the enemy, and to provide for them the same as for our own soldiers. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
oughout by skill, courage, and unerring judgment, and worthy of the solid reputation as a soldier he has acquired by many previous years of faithful and distinguished military service. I desire also especially to mention Brig.-Gen. Elliott, Surgeon McParlin, Col. Beckwith, Lieut.-Col. T. C. H. Smith, Capt. Piper, Chief of Artillery, Capt. Merriett of the Engineers, and Lieut. Shunk, Chief of Ordnance. I must also honorably mention the following members of my staff, the conduct of all of whom m is executed. By command of Major-General Pope. (Signed) Geo. D. Ruggles, Colonel and Chief of Staff. A true copy: T. C. H. Smith, Lieut.-Colonel and A. D.C. headquarters army of Virginia Bristow station, August 28, 1862, 11 A. M. Surgeon McParlin, Medical Director Army of Virginia: Sir: Major-General Pope directs that you take measures to hunt up the wounded of the enemy, and to provide for them the same as for our own soldiers. I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 8. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Relative numbers and losses at slaughter's mountain ( Cedar Run ) (search)
thouse and beyond, and never entirely returned to their commands. He also states that on the 10th Banks' corps was reduced to about 5,000 men. Thus Pope puts the loss at from 2,800 to 3,000 men including stragglers, the larger part of whom returned to their commands. General Gordon, following Strother, gives the Federal loss as 1,161 killed and wounded, and 732 missing, of whom half were prisoners and the remainder stragglers. This would give an actual loss of about 2,000. Medical Director McParlin says: In the Second corps (Banks'), which was principally engaged, the losses were 280 killed, 1,346 wounded, and 241 missing. This report underestimates the full number of wounded and missing. By this estimate the total loss in Banks' corps was over 1,867. The Surgeon-General (Federal) reports the total loss among all the troops engaged as-- Killed450 Wounded660 Missing290 In this report the 660 is evidently a misprint, and was probably intended to be 1,660. If so,
Edward Porter Alexander, Military memoirs of a Confederate: a critical narrative, Chapter 20: battle of the Wilderness (search)
rigades were driven back entirely by the artillery fire, our guns giving little attention to their artillery but confining their fire to the infantry. Only a few of these approached our abattis. None penetrated it, and the first attack was never renewed. About 10 A. M., Meade ordered the attack discontinued, and the troops withdrawn. Few of our infantry were engaged and none of them heavily for any length of time, the whole affair being decided by the artillery of the 2d and 3d corps. McParlin, Medical Director, reports of this affair:— Five hundred and fifty-two wounded were the result, and the character of the wounds were unusually severe, a large proportion being caused by shell and canister. Our own loss was very trifling. Grant, on the 19th, was preparing to move Hancock at night on the road to Richmond and had issued the order about noon. In the afternoon, he was interrupted in his preparations by the appearance of Ewell with his corps, about 6000 men, in his rear.
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
McComas, William R.: Port Gibson, Miss. 24 i, 605 McCook, Daniel: Chickamauga, Ga 30 i, 872a McCown, John P.: Island no.10 8, 767 Stone's River, Tenn. 20 i, 916 McFeely, Aaron: Gentilly's Plantation, Mo 41 i, 733 MacKEYey, Thomas J.: Pilot Knob, Mo 41 i, 708 McLaws, Lafayette: Knoxville Campaign 31 i, 493 McLoughlin, William: Chickamauga, Ga. 30 i, 644 McMahon, Edward: Virginia and Tennessee Railroad, Va. 29 i, 947 McParlin, Thomas A.: Hospitals, Richmond Campaign 42 i, 190 McPherson, James B.: Chattahoochee River, Ga. 38 v, 57, 58 Shiloh, Tenn. 10 i, 183 McQuade, James: Chancellorsville, Va. 25 i, 517 Marshall, Humphrey: Carter's Raid 20 i, 97, 100 Middle Creek, Ky 7, 51 Meade, George G.: Mine Run Campaign 29 i, 19 Meister, C.: New Madrid, Mo., and Island no.10 8, 146 Merrill, Lewis: Fourche Bayou, Ark. 22 i, 493 Meysenberg, Theodore A
Capt. Calvin D. Cowles , 23d U. S. Infantry, Major George B. Davis , U. S. Army, Leslie J. Perry, Joseph W. Kirkley, The Official Military Atlas of the Civil War, Authorities. (search)
McGregory, Samuel E.: Mobile (Ala.) Campaign, 1865 110, 1 Mobile, Ala. 105, 1; 107, 5 Fort Morgan, Ala., Aug. 9-22, 1864 63, 1 MacKEYey, Thomas J.: Little Rock, Ark., approaches to, Aug., 1863 32, 6 Price's Missouri Expedition, Aug. 29-Dec. 2, 1864 47, 1 McMakin, Joseph: Antietam, Md., Sept. 16-17, 1862 28, 1, 2 McMaster, John B.: Waynesborough, Va., March 2, 1865 72, 7 MacOMBmb John N.: Manassas Junction, Va., April, 1862 10, 9 McParlin, Thomas A.: Union, Hospitals, May 4-June 12, 1864 94, 5, 7 McPherson, James B.: Atlanta, Ga., July 22, 1864 45, 3 Canton, Miss., Oct. 14-20, 1863 71, 15 Dallas Line, Ga., May 25-June 5, 1864 43, 5, 6, 9; 48, 3, 4; 90, 6 Fort Donelson, Tenn., Feb. 12-16, 1862 11, 2, 5 Fort Henry, Tenn., Feb. 6, 1862 11, 1, 2, 4 Resaca, Ga., May 8-13, 1864 63, 4 Mallory, C. A.: Antietam, Md., Sept. 16-17, 1862 28, 1 Margedant, William: Gauley Bridge,
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.33 (search)
ming the rebel intrenched camp on that side being evidently of the most extreme character, and both corps having artfully, but unsuccessfully, sought for a weak point where they might break through, Grant at 9 o'clock ordered the attack to cease. Warren maintained a vigorous artillery duel with the rebel batteries around the courthouse until 11 o'clock, when both parties ceased firing. Our losses by the morning's work are reckoned by General Meade at 500 killed and wounded. Medical director McParlin, page 232 of Records, says: On the morning of the 18th the Second corps moved to the right and attacked the enemy's works; 552 wounded were the result, and the character of the wounds were unusually severe, a large proportion being caused by shell and canister. Major-General Hancock, page 337, says: On the 17th Tyler's division of heavy artillery, Brigadier-General R. O. Tyler commanding, and the Corcoran Legion (infantry) joined the Second corps, making in all a reinforce