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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 14 2 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for G. E. McPherson or search for G. E. McPherson in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 25: capture of Fort Hindman or Arkansas Post. (search)
nsas Post had a most exhilarating effect on the troops, and they were a different set of men when they arrived at Milliken's Bend than they were when they left the Yazoo River. After the troops were settled in their tents opposite Vicksburg, it became apparent that there could be no harmonious cooperation while McClernand remained in command of all the military forces. His peculiarities unfitted him for such a command, and these peculiarities became so offensive to Generals Sherman and McPherson, and to Admiral Porter, that they urged General Grant to take command himself as the only chance for the success of the enterprise, and in consequence, the latter hastened to Milliken's Bend or Young's Point and assumed the command of all the forces, which he was entitled to do, being military commander of the department. Mississippi Squadron, January 1, 1863. (excepting some of the vessels engaged at Vicksburg.) Acting Rear-Admiral David D. Porter, Commander-in-Chief. Receivin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 26: siege of Vicksburg. (search)
ome to supersede Sherman in the Yazoo River just after the troops had fallen back to the transports, and he had accompanied the Army to Arkansas Post, but with the express understanding with Admiral Porter that he would not interfere with General Sherman. This he refrained from doing until the enemy was beaten, and at that moment he assumed command and made all the reports himself. There were splendid generals in that Army, all men of the highest military acquirements, such as Sherman, McPherson, Steele and Smith, who now saw placed at their head an officer who had not only no qualifications for managing an Army of such a size, but had not the necessary knowledge to be the leader of anything more than a division under another general. These and many other considerations induced General Grant to take the command of the Army at Vicksburg himself. He had become convinced that the siege would be a long one. and made his preparations accordingly. Hearrived in person at Young's Poin
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 28: passage of the fleet by Vicksburg and capture of Grand Gulf.--capture of Alexandria, etc. (search)
ar of Jackson, would have been kept open by the gun-boats; and the main Army instead of having to land at Bruensburg, eight or ten miles below Grand Gulf, could have disembarked at the latter point and marched to the rear of Vicksburg by favorable roads. Instead of carrying out his instructions, McClernand advanced only to Perkins' Landing, where he pitched his tents (although he had been directed to leave these behind on account of the difficulties of transportation), and called upon General McPherson for rations, of which he had failed to provide himself a sufficient supply. Perkins' Landing seemed to have such a fascination for McClernand that he remained there until Grant ordered him to move on. Admiral Porter proceeded in the wooden gun-boat General Price to reconnoitre Grand Gulf,and ascertained that large numbers of troops were engaged in constructing extensive fortifications. Some guns were already mounted and others lying on the ground. The Price had but two guns and
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 29: siege of Vicksburg--continued. (search)
wing in General Sherman's corps. This battery was worked with marked ability, and elicited the warmest praises from the commanding general. One thousand shells were fired into the enemy's works from Lieutenant-Commander Selfridge's guns. His services being required up the river, I relieved him a few days before the surrender, and Lieutenant-Commander Walker supplied his place and conducted the firing with the same ability. Acting-Master Charles B. Dahlgren was ordered to report to General McPherson for duty, and was assigned the management of the 9-inch guns, which were admirably served. Acting-Master Reed, of the Benton, had charge of the batteries at Fort Benton-so named by General Herron in honor of the occasion. General Herron generously acknowledged the services of those I sent him, which communication I enclose with this report. I have endeavored to do justice to all who were immediately engaged in the struggle for the mastery of the Mississippi. To the Army do we o
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 42: Red River expedition.--continued. (search)
pril; the passage having been made with difficulty and danger, occupying several days. Several gun-boats and transports, being then unable to ascend the river, remained at Alexandria or returned to the Mississippi. While at Alexandria, Major-General McPherson, commanding at Vicksburg, called for the immediate return of the marine brigade — a part of General Smith's command — to protect the Mississippi, for which service it had been specially organized. The transports of this brigade were unaIt was not supposed at that time that a depot or garrison at Alexandria would be required; and this command, being without available land or water transportation, was permitted to return to the Mississippi, in compliance with the demands of General McPherson; this reduced the strength of the advancing column about 3.000 men. The condition of the river and the inability of the transports to pass the Falls made it necessary to establish a depot of supplies at Alexandria, and a line of wagon tr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
ter's Mates, Geo. H. Bartlett, C. F. Moore and A. Truesdell; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, C. A. Norris; Acting-Third-Assistants, W. H. Capen and Robert Mulready. Steamer O. M. Pettit. Acting-Master, T. E. Baldwin; Acting-Master's Mates, E. L. Smith, Charles Hanson and E. P. Crocker; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, Reuben McClanahan; Acting-Third-Assistants, Aug. Wandell and Wm. P. Wynn. Steamer Norwich. Acting-Masters, F. B. Merriam and R. B. Arrants; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. E. McPherson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. C. Boardman; Acting-Ensigns, J. H. Linscott and S. S. Hand; Acting-Master's Mates, A. J. L. Barker, Peter Moakler, T. M. Durham and Henry Sinclair; Engineers: Acting-Second-Assistant, P. B. Robinson; Acting-Third-Assistants, A. A. Odell, Benjamin Cobb, Jr., and W. W. Thain. Steamer Mary Sanford. Acting-Master, Wm. Rogers; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. C. Bissell; Acting-Ensigns, M. J. Daly, C. A. Pike, G. W. Pease and W. Caldwell, Jr
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 50: Second attack on Fort Fisher. (search)
. B. Sodenberg; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, H. K. Wheeler; Acting-Assistant-Paymaster, S. B. Huey; Engineers: Second-Assistants. W. H. Messenger, J. J. Noble and H. C. Beckwith; Third-Assistant, H. F. Loveaire; Acting-Third-Assistant, George Holton; Captain's Clerk, C. M. B. Harris. *Sassacus--Third-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, John L. Davis; Acting-Volunteer-Lieutenant, A. W. Muldaur; Acting-Ensigns, William H. Mayer, Jr., August Adler, H. W. O'Harra and David Stephen; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, G. E. McPherson; Acting-Assistant Paymaster, G. W. Garthwaite; Acting-Master's Mates, T. D. Marble and J. S. O'Brien; Engineers: Second-Assistants, J. H. Huxley, R. N. Ellis and O. W. Allisson; Acting-Third-Assistants, Wm. Raynor, H. S. Mack and A. Bigelow; Acting-Gunner, Neil Martin. Tallapoosa--Third-rate. Lieutenant-Commander, J. E. DeHaven; Acting-Master, J. H. Platt; Acting-Ensigns, Jonathan Jenney, W. A. Rich, A. E. Dunham and J. D. Babcock; Acting-Assistant Surgeon, J. E. Warn