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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for J. B. McPherson or search for J. B. McPherson in all documents.

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y possession of the pontoon-bridge, and thus cut off General Hoke's brigade from any escape, except by swimming. Our extreme right being thrown back, the brave Colonel Godwin, although surrounded on all sides, except on the river-side, still fought on, and when compelled to yield ground to overwhelming odds, fell back with a force of about seventy-five men, still returning the enemy's fire, and refused to surrender until fighting was useless. Lieutenant-Colonel Tate and Major York, Captains McPherson and Ray, and Lieutenant Mebane, of the Sixth, with Captain Adams, of the staff, broke away, and escaped over the bridge in the darkness. Lieutenants Williams, Smith, and Fitzgerald, of the Fifty-fourth; Brown, of the Sixth, with a few others, plunged into the river and swam safely over; but, unfortunately, some others were drowned. Lieutenant-Colonel H. Jones, Jr., of the Fifty-seventh, and Captain White, of the Sixth, plunged in to swim, but the coldness of the water compelled them
a force under General Steele to Helena to cooperate with General Schofield's troops against Little, Rock, and another under Generals Ord and Herron to New-Orleans, to reenforce General Banks for such ulterior operations as he might deem proper to undertake. Some expeditions were also sent to the Red River, and to Harrisonburgh and Monroe, on the Washita, to break up and destroy guerrilla bands. After General Grant left Vicksburgh to assume the general command east of the Mississippi, General McPherson moved with a part of his force to Canton, Mississippi, scattering the enemy's cavalry, and destroying his materials and roads in the centre of that State. Department of the Missouri. The withdrawal to Missouri of a large part of our forces in Arkansas, as was stated in my last annual report, left the frontier of the former exposed to raids, of which the rebels were prompt to take advantage. Marmaduke, with the advance of Hindman's rebel army, moved forward with the purpose of en
of water in the Mississippi, boats had arrived irregularly, and had brought despatches that seemed to conflict in meaning, and that John E. Smith's division, of McPherson's corps, had been ordered up to Memphis, and that I should take that division and leave one of my own in its stead to hold the line of the Big Black. I detailed my Third division, General Tuttle, to remain and report to Major-General J. B. McPherson, commanding the Seventeenth corps, at Vicksburgh; and that of General John E. Smith, already started for Memphis, was styled the Third division, though it still belonged to the Seventeenth army corps. This division is also composed of throwever, to retain command of the army in the field. At Iuka I made what appeared to me the best disposition of matters relating to this department, giving General McPherson full powers as to Mississippi, and General Hurlbut as to West-Tennessee, and assigned General Blair to the command of the Fifteenth army corps; and I summone
, commanding the Fourth Ohio cavalry, of General McPherson's body-guard, two pioneer corps, and maknger's Ferry; the other under command of General McPherson, crossing the river at the railroad bridd respectively by Major-Generals Hurlbut and McPherson, with Major-General Sherman in command of thregiments of infantry. During the night General McPherson communicated by one of his aids, Lieutenal to their menagerie in the person of Beast McPherson. The General felt badly, but could not weepor of the town; I came here in search of General McPherson, to make some arrangement by which we coe the line of the Southern Railroad, and General McPherson's division at the railroad-crossing. Af of their dead being left on the field. General McPherson's infantry forces marched up rapidly, anrious encounter. With his usual energy, General McPherson continued to press them closely, and so ed on the evening of February fifth, and General McPherson at once ordered the gallant Tenth Missou
o I went to him and got him to scare it out of her. I was lucky, so many negroes went from about here; all of Mr. McElmore's, Semmes's, and Dr. Johnston's — he had but two old ones, all are gone. I do not think that you have any idea how bad the Yankees are. I thought I knew, but I did not know the half. They took old Mrs.----'s teeth, all her spoons and knives, and destroyed all provisions and corn which they could not use. Two army corps were here — with Generals Sherman, Hurlbut, McPherson, and Leggett. Mother has been sick ever since the Yankees left. How glad I am that I did not get sick! No one need want to be with the Yankees, even for a few days. They staid here from Sunday until Saturday morning, and it appeared like a month. I have no time to write more; will write again soon. Love to all. Your daughter, S. E. P. B. Operations of the cavalry under Generals Smith and Grierson. Memphis, Tenn., February 27. From an officer attached to General Griers