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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 7 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Joshua Lawrence Chamberlain, The Passing of the Armies: The Last Campaign of the Armies., Chapter 3: the White Oak Road. (search)
thousand strong, was sent to the entrenchments along the Claiborne Road, and Roberts's Brigade of North Carolina cavalry, to picket the White Oak Road from the Claiborne, the right of their entrenchments, to Five Forks. On the thirtieth, the Fifth Corps, relieved by the Second, moved to the left along the Boydton Road, advancing its left towards the right of the enemy's entrenchments on the White Oak Road. Lee, also, apprehensive for his right, sent McGowan's South Carolina Brigade and McRae's North Carolina, of Hill's Corps, to strengthen Bushrod Johnson's Division in the entrenchments there; but took two of Johnson's brigades-Ransom's and Wallace's — with three brigades of Pickett's Division (leaving Hunton's in the entrenchments), to go with Pickett to reinforce Fitzhugh Lee at Five Forks. W. H. F. Lee's Division of cavalry, about one thousand five hundred men, and Rosser's, about one thousand, were also ordered to Five Forks. These reinforcements did not reach Five Forks un
Fitzhugh Lee, General Lee, Chapter 10: Sharpsburg and Fredericksburg. (search)
he field, and the brave General Starke (as General Lee called him), who succeeded him, was killed. General Lawton was wounded, and was succeeded by Early, who had been supporting the cavalry and horse artillery in defending a most important hill, which if occupied by the enemy would have commanded and enfiladed Jackson's position, and who got in with his brigade, as he usually did, at the proper moment. Hood and Early, re-enforced by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt, and Garland, under Colonel McRae, of Hill's division, and D. R. Jones, under Colonel G. T. Anderson, now took up the fighting; the Federals were again driven back, and again brought up fresh troops. General McLaws arrived just in time to meet them; General Walker brought from the right, together with Early's division, drove the Federals back in confusion, beyond the position occupied at the beginning of the engagement. The long lines of blue which first recoiled from the walls of gray on the Southern left were Hook
the volunteers lend a ready hand to carry out every order. Pickens is covered by our batteries on three sides. There are eight between the Navy-Yard and Fort Barrancas, four between the latter and the light-house, and a formidable mortar battery in the rear of Fort McRae. There is also a heavy mortar battery in the rear of Barrancas. All these works have been erected by the hands of the volunteers, and are armed with the very heaviest and best of artillery. The channel on a line between McRae and Pickens has been obstructed by sinking a number of small vessels. It was supposed that every thing would be complete by the middle of the coming week, after which we shall have a bombardment that will be worthy of record. Pickens must fall, and the more men they put in it the greater will be the destruction. Besides Pickens, the enemy have thrown up a battery on the island some five miles from the fort, which they are now engaged in arming for the struggle. Some hundred or more horse
en the rebel forces under Col. Steele, and the National forces commanded by Col. Canby. The battle lasted from nine o'clock in the morning till sundown, and resulted in the defeat of the National troops, who were obliged to retreat to the Fort. McRae's battery of six pieces was captured by the rebels, after a gallant defence in which Capt. McRae was killed.--(Doc. 55.) Capt. Nathaniel P. Gordon, commander of the slave-ship Erie, was executed at New York, according to sentence. About thrCapt. McRae was killed.--(Doc. 55.) Capt. Nathaniel P. Gordon, commander of the slave-ship Erie, was executed at New York, according to sentence. About three o'clock in the morning he attempted to commit suicide by swallowing strychnine, which he had concealed in his cell, but the exertions of three physicians managed to prolong his life sufficiently to allow the execution, which took place at a quarter past twelve o'clock. The first battalion of Connecticut cavalry, three hundred and twenty-five men, under the command of Major Judson M. Lyon, passed through New York City en route for Wheeling, Va., to join Gen. Rosecrans. The Massachus
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3., Chapter 5: the Chattanooga campaign.--movements of Sherman's and Burnside's forces. (search)
and in the summer of 1863 the post was in command of General B. M. Prentiss, whose troops were so sorely smitten at Shiloh. See page 273, volume II. The Confederates in Arkansas, under such leaders as Sterling Price, Marmaduke, Parsons, Fagan, McRae, and Walker,. were then under the control of General Holmes, who, at the middle of June, asked and received permission of General Kirby Smith, commander of the Trans-Mississippi Department, to attack Prentiss. He designated Clarendon, on the Whi Helena, they were marching to certain defeat and humiliation. They advanced at midnight, and took position within a mile of the outer works; July 4. and at daylight moved to the assault in three columns: Price, with the brigades of Parsons and McRae, over three thousand strong, to attack a battery on Graveyard Hill; Fagan, with four regiments of infantry, to assail another on Hindman's Hill; and Marmaduke, with seventeen hundred and fifty men, to storm a work on Righton's Hill. Price was
rkansas Infantry341602 King's regiment Arkansas Infantry575728 Smead's regiment Arkansas Infantry488745 Light battery artillery    2,4003,741 Maury's Brigade.   Brig. Gen. D. H. Maury commanding.   Adams' battalion Arkansas Infantry561597 McRae's regiment Arkansas Infantry416673 Garland's regiment Texas Infantry   Moore's regiment Texas Infantry840840 -----Regiment Texas Dismounted Cavalry   Light battery artillery    1,8172,110 Roane's Brigade.   Brig. Gen. J. S. Roane commandinamuel Jones commanding. First Brigade.Second Brigade. Brig. Gen. Albert Rust commandingBrig. Gen. Dabney H. Maury commanding. Carroll's regiment (Arkansas).  Jones' battalion (Arkansas).Adams' battalion (Arkansas). King's regiment (Arkansas).McRae's regiment (Arkansas). Lemoyne's battalion (Arkansas).Garland's regiment (Texas). McCarver's battalion (Arkansas).Moore's regiment (Texas). Smead's regiment (Arkansas).Regiment Texas Dismounted Cavalry. Battery.Battery. Third Briga
pares to hold New Mexico Sibley brigade Fort Craig Sibley declines to attack battle of Valverde heroism and death of McRae fight at Apache Pass Rebels occupy Santa Fe they abandon New Mexico. The frontiers of Texas, Mexican and savage, we found themselves confronted by a portion of our regular cavalry, Lt.-Col. Roberts, with two most efficient batteries, Capt. McRae and Lt. Hall, supported by a large force of regular and volunteer infantry. Our batteries opening upon him, Pyron, grom the wooded cover and leaped over the line of low sand-hills behind which they had lain, and made a desperate rush upon McRae's battery confronting them. Volley after volley of grape and canister was poured through their ranks, cutting them down eir advance. They were 1,000 when they started; a few minutes later, they were but 900; but the battery was taken; while McRae, choosing death rather than flight, Lieut. Michler, and most of their men, lay dead beside their guns. Our supporting in
dered by Jackson to replace Jackson's own division, which had suffered so severely and was so nearly out of ammunition that it had to be temporarily withdrawn from the combat. By this time, Ricketts and Meade had pushed the Rebel line back across the corn-field and the road, into the woods beyond, and was following with eager, exulting cheers. But Hood's division, somewhat refreshed, had by this time returned to the front, backed by the brigades of Ripley, Colquitt. Garland (now under Col. McRae), and D. R. Jones, by whom the equilibrium of the fight was restored; our men being hurled back by terrible volleys from the woods, followed by a charge across the corn-field in heavy force. Hooker called up his nearest brigade; but it was not strong enough, and he sent at once to Doubleday: Give me your best brigade instantly! That brigade came down the hill on our right at double-quick, and was led by Hartsuff into the corn-field, and steadily up the slope beyond it, forming on the cre
anguinary conflict had begun to tell on the resources of the Confederates. Here were Price, and Parsons, and Marmaduke, with what the waste of war had left of their Missourians; Holmes had evidently swept Arkansas to swell the brigades of Fagan, McRae, and Walker; yet he reports his total force at 7,646; or about twice the number he vainly struggled to overcome. He needed twice that number to give his attack a fair chance of success. His dispositions appear to have been judicious; his move pass them riverward, no matter on what pretext, he rested his men till midnight; when they were moved forward to within a mile or so of the outworks, where they halted till daybreak, and then pushed on. Price, with the brigades of Parsons and McRae, numbering 3,095, was directed to assault and carry Graveyard hill (Battery C); and he did it, under a tempest of grape, canister, and musketry, repelling its defenders and capturing some of their guns. But he found them shotwedged or divested o
., at Corinth, 230; at Lamar, 286; triumphs at Raymond, 305; captures Clinton and Jackson, 306; at Champion Hills, 307; at Vicksburg, 312; in command of Vicksburg, 537; commands Army of Tennessee under Sherman, 564; killed before Atlanta, 633. McRae, Capt., heroic death at Valverde, 23. McRae, Col., at Antietam, 206. Meade, Gen. George G., at Gaines's Mill, 156; at Malvern Hill, 162; at South Mountain, 198; at Antietam, 205-6; at Fredericksburg, 347; at Chancellorsville, 361; succeeds McRae, Col., at Antietam, 206. Meade, Gen. George G., at Gaines's Mill, 156; at Malvern Hill, 162; at South Mountain, 198; at Antietam, 205-6; at Fredericksburg, 347; at Chancellorsville, 361; succeeds Gen. Hooker in command, 375; fights Lee at Gettysburg, 380-388; his caution, 389; holds a council of war, 392; crosses the Potomac and fights in Manassas Gap, 393; Lee chases him up to Centerville, 396; his advance to Mine Run, 399 to 402; advances into the Wilderness, 566; at Cold Harbor, 583; fails to hold the Weldon road, 587; pursues Lee, 743. Meagher, Brig.-Gen. T. F., at Gaines's Mill, 162; at Antietam, 208; at Fredericksburg, 345. Mechanicsville, Va., battle of, 153; Unionists wit
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