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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 23 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 16 2 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 12 0 Browse Search
Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 12 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 8 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 7 3 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 1. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 1: The Opening Battles. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Frederick H. Dyer, Compendium of the War of the Rebellion: Regimental Histories 6 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Col. John C. Moore, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 9.2, Missouri (ed. Clement Anselm Evans). You can also browse the collection for McRae or search for McRae in all documents.

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t it out to the bitter end. McCulloch's and Pearce's infantry were on the east side of the creek, where McCulloch had former the men so as to meet Sigel's attack and to protect Price's rear, posting the Third Louisiana, McIntosh's regiment and McRae's battalion within protecting distance of Woodruff's battery, which was firing across the creek. He had not more than made these dispositions when a force of the enemy appeared, moving down the creek on the eastern side with the evident intention of charging Woodruff's battery. Leaving Gratiot to support Woodruff, he ordered Mc-Intosh, with his regiment dismounted, the Third Louisiana and McRae's battalion to meet the advancing Federals. They charged and drove back Plummer's battalion of regular infantry and a regiment of Home Guards, with a loss of about 100 on each side. Plummer was severely wounded. Sigel had not been heard from since the first dash early in the morning. He had, in fact, taken position on the Fayetteville ro
arly indicated the reason for his change of base. But days and weeks passed and nothing positive was done. At last orders looking to a movement of the troops were issued. On the 18th General Price ordered Marmaduke and his division to join him at Cottonplant, and on the 23d General Holmes issued an address to the army. The order of battle was issued on the 3d of July, the troops then being concentrated around Helena, with the full knowledge of the enemy. General Price, with Parsons' and McRae's brigades, was to assault the fort on Graveyard hill, Fagan the fort on Hindman hill, Marmaduke the fort on Reiter hill, and Walker was to hold himself in position to resist any troops that might approach Reiter hill and when that hill was captured enter the town and act against the enemy as circumstances might indicate. The attack was to be made at daylight on the following morning. All the preceding day steamboats had been arriving at Helena with reinforcements for the Federals, a larg
s busy as possible in order that the ammunition train might cross the road in safety. Shelby entered eagerly on the work assigned him. With his own and Jackman's, McRae's and Dobbins' brigades—the second and third of which he had organized since he went to North Arkansas—he moved down and captured, after a hard fight, the forts attaneously. Shelby gathered his scattered command together and stood his ground. He intended to retreat, but not until he had struck the enemy a blow. Hunter and McRae formed on the left and Jackman and some detached regiments on the right of the old brigade. Twice he received the attack of the Federals and drove them back, and twice they reformed and renewed the attack. He was fighting to get McRae's undisciplined brigade and the wagons and artillery out of his way. As soon as these disappeared in the timber that skirted the prairie, he charged with his and Jackman's brigades, and before the enemy had recovered from the shock, turned and galloped off.