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Col. J. J. Dickison, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 11.2, Florida (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 6 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 2 0 Browse Search
Jefferson Davis, The Rise and Fall of the Confederate Government 2 0 Browse Search
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2., Chapter 4: military operations in Western Virginia, and on the sea-coast (search)
ara was run in as near Fort McRee as the depth of water would allow, accompanied by the Richmond, Captain Ellison. The latter became instantly engaged in a hot contest with the fort and the water battery, and was soon joined in the fight by the Niagara. The guns of Fort Pickens were also brought to bear upon Fort McRee; and at noon the artillery of the former and of Battery Scott, and also of the two vessels, were playing upon the devoted fortress and the surrounding batteries. The guns of McRee were all speedily silenced but one. Those of Barrancas were soon reduced to feeble efforts; and from those at the Navy Yard, and one or two other batteries, there was no response for some time before the close of the day. The bombardment from Fort Pickens was resumed early the next morning, Nov. 23, 1861. but, owing to the shallowness of the water, the vessels could not get within range of Fort McRee. The fire of Pickens was less rapid, but more effective than the day before. McRee ma
made in January to reenforce it by means of the Star of the West. This standing menace at the gates of the chief harbor of South Carolina had been tolerated by the government and people of that state, and afterward by the Confederate authorities, in the abiding hope that it would be removed without compelling a collision of forces. Fort Pickens, on one side of the entrance to the harbor of Pensacola, was also occupied by a garrison of United States troops, while the two forts (Barrancas and McRee) on the other side were in possession of the Confederates. Communication by sea was not entirely precluded, however, in the case of Fort Pickens; the garrison had been strengthened, and a fleet of federal men-of-war was lying outside of the harbor. The condition of affairs at these forts—especially at Fort Sumter—was a subject of anxiety with the friends of peace, and the hope of settling by negotiation the questions involved in their occupation had been one of the most urgent motives for
Joseph T. Derry , A. M. , Author of School History of the United States; Story of the Confederate War, etc., Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 6, Georgia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans), Chapter 3: (search)
f the navy yard, on the mainland, and Fort McRee, on a peninsula running down in the gulf about two miles from Barrancas. A mile and a half east of McRee and a little further south of Barrancas, on the western extremity of the sandy island of Santa Rosa, which thence stretches forty miles eastward, stood Fort Pickens, which, aside from Fortress Monroe and Key West, was the only fortified post held by the United States within Confederate territory. On the mainland between the navy yard and McRee, a number of batteries were placed, and preparations were on way for an attack which should bring Pickens also under the Southern flag. Between the hostile guns lay the bay of Pensacola, and on the river seven miles northward lay that city, well out of the range of fire. The Federal garrison was reinforced by several companies, and Col. Harvey Brown was put in command. Supply ships could approach without incurring the fire of the Confederate batteries, and warships were sent to blockade t
y backed out, and proceeded to Pensacola unharmed. The fire of the enemy, though terrific in sound and fury, proved to have been only slightly damaging, except to McRee. From Fort Pickens and the sand batteries we sustained very little injury. From the shipping, which fired with much greater accuracy, the fort and garrison of Mcgh much more slowly, and with only one ship. We responded, as before, with caution and deliberation. Their fire was so much slackened that our apprehension about McRee was greatly relieved, and our sand batteries played with a better prospect of success against the remaining ship. Toward evening the enemy finding all his efforts foiled that our guns were not silenced and McRee not reduced as he had predicted, turned upon the hospital and put several shots into the empty building (the sick having all been removed in anticipation of this barbarous act). The evacuation, however, was not known to them. All the appearance of occupation was kept up; the yello