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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 4 0 Browse Search
James D. Porter, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 7.1, Tennessee (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
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freesboro campaign, and then retiring to Mississippi, was there, in February, 1865, assigned to command of all Tennessee cavalry in Forrest's department, with other brigades, to form Jackson's division, one of the two provided for in Forrest's reorganization. His last military service was the cutting off of Croxton's brigade from the main body of Wilson's expedition, April, 1865. Since the close of the war General Jackson has engaged in stock raising, and is proprietor of the celebrated Belle Meade stock farm near Nashville, Tenn. Major-General Bushrod R. Johnson Major-General Bushrod R. Johnson, a distinguished Confederate officer and citizen of Tennessee, was born in Ohio in 1817. He was a cadet at the United States military academy from 1836 to 1840, when he was appointed second lieutenant in the Third infantry. He served in the Florida war, and was on frontier duty at Fort Leavenworth, Kan., when he was promoted to first lieutenant, February, 1844. He participated in
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), General Beauregard's report of the battle of Drury's Bluff. (search)
hown us on every side—we may not now speak. A magnificent audience greeted General Lee at Masonic theatre to-night (the 15th of March), and nowhere has his lecture been more warmly appreciated, or generously applauded. Ex-Governor Porter introduced General Lee in very fitting and appropriate style. After the lecture, there was a reception in the parlors of the Maxwell, where many brave men, and fair women, paid their respects to the General. The next day we had a charming day at Belle Meade, the splendid estate of General Hardin, where his sons-in-law, General Wm. H. Jackson and United States Senator Howell E. Jackson, and their accomplished ladies, did the honors with unsurpassed grace, and where we could have spent days inspecting the blooded horses, or roaming through the magnificent park, which contains over three hundred deer. General Jackson and General Lee were room-mates and intimate friends at West Point; but entering different regiments of the old army, and servin
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 11. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Editorial Paragraphs. (search)
hown us on every side—we may not now speak. A magnificent audience greeted General Lee at Masonic theatre to-night (the 15th of March), and nowhere has his lecture been more warmly appreciated, or generously applauded. Ex-Governor Porter introduced General Lee in very fitting and appropriate style. After the lecture, there was a reception in the parlors of the Maxwell, where many brave men, and fair women, paid their respects to the General. The next day we had a charming day at Belle Meade, the splendid estate of General Hardin, where his sons-in-law, General Wm. H. Jackson and United States Senator Howell E. Jackson, and their accomplished ladies, did the honors with unsurpassed grace, and where we could have spent days inspecting the blooded horses, or roaming through the magnificent park, which contains over three hundred deer. General Jackson and General Lee were room-mates and intimate friends at West Point; but entering different regiments of the old army, and servin