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Maj. Jed. Hotchkiss, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 3, Virginia (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 171 1 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 33. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 77 1 Browse Search
George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 71 3 Browse Search
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 6. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 63 1 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 46 4 Browse Search
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz) 28 0 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 8: Soldier Life and Secret Service. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 4 0 Browse Search
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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.43 (search)
was shown in Philadelphia, by General Meade's son [Colonel George Meade], a paper found amongst General Meade's effects aftGeneral Meade's effects after his death. It was folded, and on the outside of one end was written, in his well-known handwriting, in ink, Minutes of col examination of the original document deposited by Colonel George Meade with the Penn. Hist. Society.--editors. to mass fol examination of the original document deposited by Colonel George Meade with the Penn. Hist. Society.--editors. Effective ring the sitting of the council reports were brought to General Meade, and now and then we could hear heavy firing going on o of our line. I took occasion before leaving to say to General Meade that his staff-officer had regularly summoned me as a c. In referring to the matter, just as the council broke up, Meade said to me, If Lee attacks to-morrow, it will be in your frour center. I expressed the hope that he would, and told General Meade, with confidence, that if he did we would defeat him.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The breastworks at Culp's Hill. (search)
thened their work with earth. By 10 o'clock it was finished. At 6 o'clock in the evening General Meade, finding himself hard pressed on the left, and deeming an attack on the right wing improbablsmall regiments borrowed for the emergency from General Wadsworth, and placed in echelon. General Meade hardly mentioned this affair at the breastworks in his original report of the battle, and th were there think justice has never been done in the case, On the 25th of February, 1864, General Meade made the following substitution in his official report: The detachment of so large a pdge him. Also, on the same day, in reply to a letter from General Slocum on the subject, General Meade wrote in part: I am willing to admit that, if my attention had been called to the sere at first held by the entire corps and afterward by my single brigade was this: Map. When Meade ordered the whole of the Twelfth Corps from Culp's Hill to reenforce his left, Slocum ordered my
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.47 (search)
It was now past 4 o'clock in the afternoon and our troops were in position for the attack. The flank movement by which they came into position is referred to in the following dispatch from the Federal signal station on Little Round Top: To General Meade--4 o'clock P. M. The only infantry of the enemy visible is on the extreme [Federal] left; it has been moving toward Emmitsburg. It will thus be seen that the movement, in spite of our precautions, was not unobserved. The Confederate line upport on its left. General Kershaw requested me to designate the point on which his right flank should be directed, and promptly moved to the attack, the movement being taken up by the whole division. When Hood's division first attacked, General Meade, alarmed for the safety of his left wing, and doubtless fully alive to the importance of holding so vital a point as Round Top and its adjacent spurs, commenced sending reenforcements to the threatened points. We encountered some of these in
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., The cavalry battle near Gettysburg. (search)
e army from before Gettysburg. At a later date, General Howard wrote to Colonel George Meade, I did not hear your father utter a word which made me think that he then favored a withdrawal of his troops. Certainly, if General Meade had such a momentary feeling as General Slocum understood him to express, it was in direct contrmuch fighting on equal terms. Whatever opinion men may hold as to the grade of Meade's generalship, those do him a gross injustice who represent him as ever, in anyburg had been fought and won for the Union arms. Into the questions, whether Meade should not have followed up the repulse of Pickett with a general advance of hicked Lee at Falling Waters, on the 13th of July, we have no call to enter. General Meade was here entirely within his competence as the commander of an army. Any o responsibility of success or failure; yet in fact, in both these decisions General Meade was supported by a preponderance of authoritative opinion among his corps c
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3., chapter 4.58 (search)
The Meade-Sickles controversy. see also the preceding article.--editors. I. A letter from General Meade. headquarters, military division of the Atlantic, Philadelphia, March 16th, 1870. [Private.] [Colonel] G. G. Benedict, Burlington,General Meade. headquarters, military division of the Atlantic, Philadelphia, March 16th, 1870. [Private.] [Colonel] G. G. Benedict, Burlington, Vt. dear Sir: I am in receipt of your letter of the 13th inst., as also the copies of the Free press, with editorials and comments on the address of Colonel [W. W.] Grout before the Officers' Society and Legislature of the State. The substancm from that position. According to General A. A. Humphreys's statement to the Committee on the Conduct of the War, General Meade, on assuming command of the army at Frederick, expressed his desire to appoint General Humphreys his chief-of-staff, at when I could have done so with perfect ease at any moment. Longstreet's advice to Lee [to move from his right upon General Meade's communications] was sound military sense; it was the step I feared Lee would take, and to meet which and be prepare
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), I. First months (search)
ut had, at that moment, rather a troubled air. He handed a scrap of paper. General Meade opened it and his face changed. My God! he said, General Warren has half to take it all philosophically, but it was hard, very hard. Most of all to General Meade and General Humphreys, who really took it admirably, for both of them have lt lies, I shall always be astonished at the extraordinary moral courage of General Meade, which enabled him to order a retreat, when his knowledge, as an engineer a he had never before heard of so strong a case, and promises to refer it to General Meade, which indeed he does. Meanwhile the rattling of axes is heard on all side Washington think the same. I am more and more struck, on reflection, with General Meade's consistency and self-control in refusing to attack. His plan was a definhe Commissary to open a dozen boxes of the best stearine candles. However, General Meade at once orders the 6th Corps to parade, and gets hold of all the ambulances
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), chapter 3 (search)
the middle of January. He found Headquarters almost deserted, General Meade sick in Philadelphia with an attack of inflammation of the lung the fact that several divisions have lately changed position. General Meade has been seriously ill at home; but we have a telegraph that hen aides and Biddle, Mason, Cadwalader and myself, de la part de General Meade; also Rosencrantz. To Morton's Ford is some ten miles, but yourably . . . . Headquarters Army of Potomac February 2, 1864 General Meade is in excellent spirits and cracks a great many jokes and tellst; also General Humphreys. None of the Staff were invited, save George Meade, to the huge indignation of the said Staff and my great amusemenar Stevensburg, so that it was quite a ride even to get there. General Meade, though he had been out till three in the morning at the ball, s, mounted on frowsy cavalry horses and prepared to accompany. General Meade greeted them with politeness, for they were some relations of s
Colonel Theodore Lyman, With Grant and Meade from the Wilderness to Appomattox (ed. George R. Agassiz), Index (search)
as, 107, 247. McParlin, Thomas Andrew, 115, 221. Macy, George Nelson, 97, 215. Madison's ordinary, 119. Mahon, Lord, see Stanhope. Mahone, William, 188. Mangohick Church, 130. Maps, difficulties of, 136. Marivault, —, de, 290. Marseilles, anecdotes of, 191. Marshall, Charles, 361. Marshall, Elisha Gaylord, 199. Martyn, steamer, 319. Marylanders, 221. Mason, Addison Gordon, 69, 122, 249. Mat, the, 121. Matile, George Auguste, 212. Matinee musicale, 317. Meade, George, 36, 48, 75, 359. Meade, George Gordon, 97, 107, 122, 338; at Key West, III; accepts Lyman as volunteer aide, 3; manner of riding, 8; at Gettysburg, 12; characteristics, 25, 38, 57, 61, 73, 123, 128, 134, 138, 148, 167, 176, 188, 225, 358; difference with Halleck, 35; visits Washington, 36, 48; well laid plans, 46; succession to, 60; illness, 64, 345, 355; in danger, 105, 232, 238, 332; Sheridan and, 105, 271, 348; Sherman's despatch, 126; before Petersburg, 165, 214, 242; Burnside and,
rate infantry onset was the description of an officer of high rank on that side, A tumultuous rush of men, each aligning on himself, and yelling like a demon, on his own hook. The yell which has become historical, was merely another expression of the individuality of the Southern soldier, though as its moral force came to be recognized, it was rather fostered officially, and grew into an institution—it was the peculiar slogan of the Gray people. A gallant, accomplished staff-officer of General Meade's household, in a recent work on the battle of the Wilderness, pays the thrilling yell this tribute, I never heard that yell that the country in the rear did not become intensely interesting! And more than one Federal soldier has borne similar testimony. This allusion recalls to mind a visit of two days duration, made to that historic field in the summer of 1910, after an interval of forty-six years, which served to illustrate forcibly what has already been recorded in these recollec
Twenty-second Michigan, and before long was made a mounted orderly with the staff of Major-General George H. Thomas and decorated with a pair of chevrons and the title of lance-sergeant. Another Western boy who saw stirring service, though never formally enlisted, was the eldest son of General Grant, a year older than little Clem, when he rode with his father through the Jackson campaign and the siege of Vicksburg. There were other sons who rode with commanding generals, as did young George Meade at Gettysburg, as did the sons of Generals Humphreys, Abercrombie, and Heintzelman, as did Win and Sam Sumner, both generals in their own right to-day, as did Francis Vinton Greene, who had to be locked up to keep him from following his gallant father into the The first of the boy generals Surrounded by his staff, some of whom are older than he, sits Adelbert Ames (third from the left), a brigadiergen-eral at twenty-eight. He graduated fifth in his class at West Point on May 6,
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