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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 8 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.14 (search)
nant Daniel S. McCarthy, Lieutenant T. D. Moncure, Lieutenant Robert Armistead, Edward F. Barnes, Henry C. Barnes, Henry B. Boudar, George R. Crump, F. N. Crouch, William M. Dame, David S. Doggett, Preston Ellerson, Charles N. Friend, James T. Gray, Edward Gray, Edward C. Goddin, Martin L. Harvey, W. L. Harrison, Charles A. Harrington, Charles W. Harwood, George B. Harrison, William C. Kean, Sr., Robert D. Knight, J. Benjamin Lambert, S. Taylor Martin, John T. McKenna, J. V. L. McCreary, Hodijah Meade, Jesse B. Minor, Robert W. Powers, Charles Poindexter, A. M. Richardson, Robert E. Richardson, R. W. Royall, Lem Sclater, Howard Saunders, Robert Stiles, W. H. Tatum, John C. Tatum, Charles L. Todd, John Todd, Richard C. Wortham, J. Peter Williams, Frederick H. Williams, Thomas B. Wyatt, Charles E. Wingo. Second Company Howitzers.—Lieutenant William L. Shephard, Lieutenant Wallace McRae, Lieutenant Lewis Booker, E. J. Bosher, Thomas Booker, T. Roberts Baker, Luther R. Barnes, H. Y. H.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Letters of R. E. Lee. (search)
e to marching them over the rough roads of that region, at a season, too, when frosts are certain and snows are probable, unless they were better provided for encountering them without suffering. I should otherwise have endeavored to detain General Meade near the Potomac if I could not throw him to the north side. headquarters Army of Northern Virginia, October 19, 1863. Honorable James A. Seddon, Secretary of War. If General Meade is disposed to remain quiet where he is, it was my intGeneral Meade is disposed to remain quiet where he is, it was my intention, provided the army could be supplied with clothing, again to advance and threaten his position. Nothing could prevent my continuing in his front but the destitute condition of the men, thousands of whom are barefooted, a greater number partially shod, and nearly all without overcoats, blankets, or warm clothing. I think the sublimest sight of the war was the cheerfulness and alacrity exhibited by this army in pursuit of the enemy under all the trials and privations to which it is expos
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 17. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.21 (search)
to detach him to look after affairs on the coast of Carolina and Georgia, and so violent had been the unmerited attacks upon him by the Richmond press that it was thought proper to give him a letter to the Governor of South Carolina, stating what manner of man had been sent to him. There his skill as an engineer was manifested in the defences he constructed and devised. On his return to Richmond he resumed his functions of general supervisor of military affairs. In the spring of 1862 Bishop Meade lay dangerously ill. This venerable ecclesiastic had taught General Lee his catechism when a boy, and when he was announced to the Bishop the latter asked to have him shown in immediately. He answered Lee's inquiry as to how he felt by saying: Nearly gone, but I wished to see you once more, and then in a feeble voice added: God bless you, Robert, and fit you for your high and responsible duties! The great soldier stood reverently by the bed of his early preceptor in Christianity, but th