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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 20 0 Browse Search
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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.22 (search)
George H. Sharp to General Humphries, chief of staff to General Meade, simply stating that he had information from a prisoneposition to protect the depot. At 10 A. M. of the 16th General Meade advised General Grant that at daylight his pickets andd that the herd had fallen into the enemy's hands. Zzzgeneral Meade's fears well founded. General Meade was certainly General Meade was certainly correct in his report. General Meade says he had feared this raid for some time, as, with the limited force of cavalry at hiGeneral Meade says he had feared this raid for some time, as, with the limited force of cavalry at his command and the great extent of country to be watched, he had always considered Coggin's Point an unsuitable point for the to face with one in force. General Grant telegraphed General Meade from Harper's Ferry, at 9 A. M. on the 18th, that if thmy's cavalry, that they should strike the Weldon road. General Meade reports to General Grant on the 16th, at 10:30 P. M., ts see who they sent after us. First, General Humphries, General Meade's chief of staff, sent General Davies with all his cava
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 22. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), chapter 1.26 (search)
atteries that defended it, and had to give back because others failed. This division was the rear-guard that covered Lee's retreat, and I have never seen it present a sterner front than that 4th of July morning, 1864, when it stood ready to meet Meade on Seminary Ridge. In this campaign a part of Early's infantry, under Gordon, but Early himself being present, went farther north than any troops of the South during the conflict, and at Wrightsville, on the Susquehannah, June 29, 1864, the ConfGrant exploded the mine under Lee's lines at Petersburg, and on that day Sheridan had joined him there with his cavalry. The explosion, says Grant was a stupendous failure, and he lost 10,000 men in the vain endeavor; but the next day he ordered Meade to take a corps of infantry and the cavalry and to proceed August 1st, before Lee could get back to the Weldon railroad, and destroy fifteen miles of that important line. But misfortune, says Grant, never comes singly. He learned that afternoon