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Browsing named entities in The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 5: Forts and Artillery. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller). You can also browse the collection for Meade or search for Meade in all documents.

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han facing the screaming shells and whistling bullets at the front. the vicissitudes of the following campaigns. On the Gettysburg field the artillery again contested with the Confederates in probably the most stubborn fighting of the war. General Meade had three hundred guns. The Federal advance was at first gradually forced back to Cemetery Hill, where General Doubleday rallied his troops, and his artillery did excellent service in checking the foe. He relates that the first long line thaonfederates were driven out with heavy loss. The Federal artillery from Little Round Top to Cemetery Hill blazed like a volcano on the third day of the fight. Two hours after the firing opened, the chief of artillery, with the approval of General Meade, caused his guns to cease firing in order to replenish their ammunition supply. This deceived the Confederates, and Pickett's famous charge was made. No sooner was the advance begun than the Federal artillery belched forth all along the lin
in battery Rosecrans-life in the parallels on Morris Island in August, 1863. The 100-Pounder Parrotts in battery Rosecrans Morris Island in summer 1863. At ten o'clock on the night of July 28th, orders were issued to construct Battery Meade and Battery Rosecrans in the second parallel. The positions were laid out and work begun on them before midnight. Work progressed rather slowly, however, because the Confederate sharpshooters picked off every man who stuck his head above the parhad other strings to their bow, as Gillmore's amphibious diggers discovered. Though now occupying the stronghold that commanded the harbor from the south, the Federals got no farther. Ware sharpshooters! --serving the Parrotts in battery Meade Headquarters of the field officer of the second parallel The gun Swamp-Angel. One of the most famous guns in the Civil War was the Swamp-Angel. The marsh here surely deserved the name. The two engineers who explored it to select a s
f remaining with it in future campaigns, leaving General Meade in direct command, and transmitting all orders ted under Major Duane. General Benham reported to General Meade at the position selected, and was directed to proceed at once with the construction. General Meade smiled at the enthusiasm of Benham when he remarked that her Benham's arrival, a telegram was received from General Meade inquiring about the progress of the work. The ithe two lines, and reported to General Grant and General Meade the impracticability of storming the Confederate under his charge. General Benham reported to General Meade at the position selected, and was directed to proceed at once with the construction. General Meade smiled at the enthusiasm of Benham when he remarked that her Benham's arrival, a telegram was received from General Meade asking the progress on the bridge, and the enginnia Volunteers, and was executed by his own men. General Meade and General Grant sanctioned the project, and pl
immediate direction of Colonel E. C. Smeed. How well it was done is evidenced by these two photographs. In the lower one the broad wagon-way below the railroad trestles can be examined. The structure that stayed-three times had the Confederates destroyed the bridge at this point-bridgeport, Alabama The structure that stayed-three times had the Confederates destroyed the bridge at this point-bridgeport, Alabama previously felt elsewhere. On June 28, 1863, Hooker was relieved by General Meade. The crucial period of the war came at Gettysburg. The construction corps, under the personal direction of General Haupt, rendered invaluable service. Haupt had made Gettysburg his home for part of the time he was a resident of the State of Pennsylvania, and knew every road in the vicinity. He gave great assistance in divining Lee's direction of march, and by the great exertions of the corps the railroad communications were kept open, the wounded handled with celerity, and after the