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George Meade, The Life and Letters of George Gordon Meade, Major-General United States Army (ed. George Gordon Meade) 1,542 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 728 6 Browse Search
The Annals of the Civil War Written by Leading Participants North and South (ed. Alexander Kelly McClure) 378 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 3. 374 2 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 325 5 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 297 1 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 295 3 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 11. (ed. Frank Moore) 286 2 Browse Search
Oliver Otis Howard, Autobiography of Oliver Otis Howard, major general , United States army : volume 1 225 1 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 190 4 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 10. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for George G. Meade or search for George G. Meade in all documents.

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Resolution expressive of the Thanks of Congress to Major-General Joseph Hooker, and Major-General George G. Meade, and Major-General Oliver O. Howard, and the Officers and Men of the Army of the Pot resolution expressive of the thanks of Congress to Major-General Joseph Hooker, and Major-General George G. Meade, and the officers and soldiers of the army of the Potomac, which was read twice and ow of the advancing and powerful army of rebels led by General Robert E. Lee; and to Major-General George G. Meade, and Major-General Oliver O. Howard, and the officers and soldiers of that army, for person. I wish, therefore, as a recognition of his merits, to couple his name with that of General Meade, in the vote of thanks. He moved to insert after the name of General Meade the name of MajoGeneral Meade the name of Major-General Oliver O. Howard, and the amendment was agreed to. The joint resolution as amended then passed without a division. The House of Representatives, on the twenty-sixth, passed it unanimously;
on the south side of the river. Shortly after Meade advanced, the enemy's cavalry appeared on the pector-General of the fact that I had sent General Meade's division to make the movement directed bwith enemy's skirmishers. Battery opening, on Meade probably, from position on Old Richmond road. 11 o'clock A. M. Meade advanced half a mile, and holds on. Infantry of enemy in woods in front into position. That done, Reynolds will order Meade to advance. Batteries over the river are to sleft. He thinks the effect will be to protect Meade's advance. A column of the enemy's infantry i work; men fight well. Gibbon has advanced to Meade's right; men fight well, driving the enemy. MMeade has suffered severely. Doubleday to Meade's left not engaged. 2 1/4 o'clock P. M. Gibbon Meade's left not engaged. 2 1/4 o'clock P. M. Gibbon and Meade driven back from the woods. Newton gone forward. Jackson's corps of the enemy attacks od it direct. I am almost certain I have heard Meade say he had heard Burnside make the same statem[19 more...]
rding to the facts. I acted during the night under orders from General Meade, which, with my dispatches to him, and other facts, will be givdaybreak. It also will appear that the tenor of my orders from General Meade were, not that I was to prevent the escape of the enemy, but tot official relations with him. My instructions all came through General Meade, and to him all my reports were made. If General Grant had ever expressed himself displeased with me to General Meade, the latter had kept it from me; and he ever showed, by intrusting to me the advance ut was on the left flank of the infantry and artillery, army of General Meade. To facilitate the understanding of the subject, I have addeain Wm. H. H. Benyaurd, of the Regular Engineers, detached from General Meade's staff to accompany me, and who gave me most important assistaM.: Your dispatch, giving General Ayres' position, is received: General Meade directs that should you determine, by your reconnoissance, that
tenant Poore's company, and Corporal Conneway, of the Twenty-second Georgia battalion, who greatly distinguished themselves. To the officers of my personal staff I am under obligations. I lament to record the death of the gallant Captain Waring, A. A. D. C., and the wounding of Captain Twiggs, Inspector-General, and Captain Stony, A. D. C., who were stricken down, nobly discharging their duty. To Captain Taliaferro, A. A. G., Lieutenants Mazyck and Cunningham, Ordnance Officers, and Meade, A. D. C., and to Surgeon Habersham, Major Holcombe, and Captain Boote, I tender my thanks for their aid, &c., during the course of the week. I would especially mention Captain Barnwell, of the engineers. In the early part of the week, the commands of Colonel Olmstead, Lieutenant-Colonel Capers, Major Harney, and Major Bosinger, of Lieutenant-Colonel Nelson and Lieutenant-Colonel Dantzler, and the artillery under the admirable management of Lieutenant-Colonel Yates, with such officers as