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The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Index (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 17 1 Browse Search
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War. 10 0 Browse Search
Brigadier-General Ellison Capers, Confederate Military History, a library of Confederate States Military History: Volume 5, South Carolina (ed. Clement Anselm Evans) 2 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 4. 1 1 Browse Search
James Barnes, author of David G. Farragut, Naval Actions of 1812, Yank ee Ships and Yankee Sailors, Commodore Bainbridge , The Blockaders, and other naval and historical works, The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 6: The Navy. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 1 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War.. You can also browse the collection for R. W. Meade or search for R. W. Meade in all documents.

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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 47: operations of South Atlantic Blockading Squadron, under Rear-admiral Dahlgren, during latter end of 1863 and in 1864. (search)
schooner C. P. Williams, Acting-Master S. N. Freeman, were attacked by Confederate batteries in Stono River. Lieutenant-Commander Meade reports that on December 25th the enemy opened fire on the Marblehead, at 6 o'clock in the morning, from two bahad steam on the port boiler only. The gun-boat returned the enemy's fire vigorously, and, slipping his cable, Lieutenant-Commander Meade took a position nearer the batteries, and after a short encounter caused them to retreat in disorder, leaving t vessels kept up such a fire that the enemy fled precipitately. Commander Balch speaks in the highest terms of Lieutenant-Commander Meade's coolness and bravery, the management of his vessel, and the remarkable rapidity of his fire. On the conclu credit due the different vessels, which ought not to have been the case where all did so well. In addition to Lieutenant Commander Meade's gallantry in the action, he made a reconnoissance of the ground abandoned by the enemy, and then, by directio
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 53: operations of the West Gulf Squadron in the latter part of 1864, and in 1865.--joint operations in Mobile Bay by Rear-Admiral Thatcher and General Canby. (search)
d her anchor carried out; but as the norther caused the water to fall rapidly, leaving in an hour only about a foot of water alongside, the efforts to float her were unavailing. The launch grounded in the meantime, and it was deemed best not to expose the men to an attack from an overwhelming force. The schooner was therefore set on fire and the expedition returned to the Chocura. Acting-Ensigns Tracy and Beardsley accompanied Lieutenant-Commander (now Captain) R. W. Meade. Lieutenant-Commander Meade. The officers and men behaved as all men will when they are led by a judicious and gallant commander. They were not altogether unfortunate in not receiving some prize-money. Eighty bales of cotton were thrown overboard before they set fire to the schooner; this drifted out to sea, and thirty bales were picked up on the following morning, and very likely more were secured later. This was hard on the shippers; but such are the fortunes of war, and it was the only way to cripple th