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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 8. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for Meader or search for Meader in all documents.

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l charges, which we withstood and repulsed. In the evening they charged upon us with overwhelming numbers. The right of our line swung to the rear, the left fell back a few hundred yards till our line became parallel with the railroad and in the suburbs of the town. All in good order and to keep from being flanked. Here our line established itself perfectly secure from any flank movement by the enemy. During the day our regiment lost in killed, Orderly Sergeant Judd, company F, and Sergeant Meader, company B. Four wounded. November nineteenth, we still maintained our line under a heavy fire, and returning the same with our long-ranged Enfield rifles, that kept the rebels at a distance of four and five hundred yards. In the evening they set their battery on us, making some very good shots, but doing no damage. Corporal Gilbert, company B, was severely wounded in the right arm by a Minie ball. In the evening we were relieved and moved back through town to the east side. As we
ttacked with great vigor, compelling our force to slowly retire some hundred yards. The action now became lively, and the loss of the day was seriously apprehended; but Colonel Robinson, sabre in hand, cheered on the men, and the gallant fellows, many of them without a shot in their guns, rushed forward and drove the enemy into the woods and off the field. The day was won, but with severe loss in both officers and men. Captain Moss, of the First Louisiana cavalry, and Lieutenants Graham and Meader, of the Eighty-seventh Illinois mounted infantry, together with several privates, were wounded, and six or seven privates were killed. Colonel Lucas, with his First cavalry brigade, closely followed by Colonel Robinson, with his Third cavalry brigade, pursued the enemy several miles, as far as Carroll's saw-mill, where he found them drawn up on a wooded hill, with four guns in position. Heavy infantry and artillery firing continued until nightfall, when, in the dusk of the evening, a hea