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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2. 58 4 Browse Search
Horace Greeley, The American Conflict: A History of the Great Rebellion in the United States of America, 1860-65: its Causes, Incidents, and Results: Intended to exhibit especially its moral and political phases with the drift and progress of American opinion respecting human slavery from 1776 to the close of the War for the Union. Volume II. 22 0 Browse Search
Benson J. Lossing, Pictorial Field Book of the Civil War. Volume 2. 10 0 Browse Search
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War. Volume 3. 8 2 Browse Search
General James Longstreet, From Manassas to Appomattox 7 1 Browse Search
The Photographic History of The Civil War: in ten volumes, Thousands of Scenes Photographed 1861-65, with Text by many Special Authorities, Volume 2: Two Years of Grim War. (ed. Francis Trevelyan Miller) 6 0 Browse Search
Comte de Paris, History of the Civil War in America. Vol. 3. (ed. Henry Coppee , LL.D.) 5 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: August 1, 1861., [Electronic resource] 4 2 Browse Search
Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Poetry and Incidents., Volume 1. (ed. Frank Moore) 3 1 Browse Search
The Daily Dispatch: July 30, 1861., [Electronic resource] 3 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2.. You can also browse the collection for Thomas F. Meagher or search for Thomas F. Meagher in all documents.

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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The Peninsular campaign. (search)
ion reached the field at 3:30 and immediately went into action. At about 5 P. M. General Porter reported his position as critical, and the brigades of French and Meagher — of Richardson's division — were ordered to reenforce him, although the fearless commander of the Second Corps, General Sumner, thought it hazardous to remove th, left alone when Slocum crossed to the aid of Porter, was so seriously threatened that I called on Sumner's Corps to send a brigade to its support. French and Meagher reached the field before dusk, just after Porter's Corps had been forced by superior numbers to fall back to an interior position nearer the bridges, and, by thei within a few yards, poured in a single volley, and then dashed forward with the bayonet. At 7 P. M. The enemy was accumulating fresh troops, and the brigades of Meagher and Sickles were sent from Sumner's and Heintzelman's Corps to reenforce Porter and Couch; fresh batteries were moved forward from the reserve artillery and the a
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Opposing forces at Seven Pines, May 31-June 1, 1862. (search)
y. Major-General George B. McClellan. Second Army Corps, Brig.-Gen. Edwin V. Sumner. first division, Brig.-Gen. Israel B. Richardson. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Oliver 0. Howard (w), Col. Thomas J. Parker: 5th N. H., Col. E. E. Cross (w), Lieut.-Col. Samuel G. Langley; 61st N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow; 64th N. Y., Col. T. J. Parker, Capt. Rufus Washburn; 81st Pa., Col. James Miller (k), Lieut.-Col. Charles F. Johnson. Brigade loss: k, 95; w, 398; in, 64=557. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher: 63d N. Y., Col. John Burke; 69th N. Y., Col. Robert Nugent; 88th N. Y., Lieut.-Col. Patrick Kelly. Brigade loss: k, 7; w, 31; m, 1=39. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. French: 52d N. Y., Col. Paul Frank; 57th N. Y., Col. Samuel K. Zook; 66th N. Y., Col. Joseph C. Pinckney; 53d Pa., Col. John R. Brooke. Brigade loss: k, 32; w, 188; m, 22 = 242. Artillery, Capt. G. W. Hazzard: B, 1st N. Y., Capt. Rufus D. Pettit; G, 1st N. Y., Capt. John D. Frank; A and C, 4th U. S., Capt. G.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 5.26 (search)
nd the second line, and was not again in action. The regiment next to it on the right was forced back a short distance. The left of Richardson's front line was so rudely shaken that all available means were used to strengthen it; a battery and Meagher's brigade were put in to cover the gap, and Burns's brigade, previously detached to cover the communications with the bridges, was recalled and hurriedly sent by General Sumner to Richardson's assistance. It will be seen later that this stagglved upon Colonel Cross, of the 5th New Hampshire, who says: Finding that the three other regiments of the brigade had been some time in action and severely handled, I directed that they should move out of the woods and reform in the rear of Meagher's brigade, while I advanced my regiment to occupy the ground. We moved forward in line of battle through a thick wood, and about three hundred yards from the railroad track encountered the rebel line of battle. . . . The fire was now very close
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
urtevant; 7th N. Y., Col. George W. von Schack; 61st N. Y., Col. Francis C. Barlow; 81st Pa., Col. Charles F. Johnson (w), Lieut.-Col. Ell T. Conner (k), Maj. H. Boyd McKeen. Brigade loss: k, 61; w, 356; m, 137 == 554. Second Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher, Col. Robert Nugent, Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher: 29th Mass., Col. Ebenezer W. Peirce (w), Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Barnes; 63d N. Y., Col. John Burke (w), Lieut.-Col. Henry Fowler, Capt. Joseph O'Neill; 69th N. Y., Col. Robert Nugent; 8Brig.-Gen. Thomas F. Meagher: 29th Mass., Col. Ebenezer W. Peirce (w), Lieut.-Col. Joseph H. Barnes; 63d N. Y., Col. John Burke (w), Lieut.-Col. Henry Fowler, Capt. Joseph O'Neill; 69th N. Y., Col. Robert Nugent; 88th N. Y., Col. Henry M. Baker, Maj. James Quinlan. Brigade loss: k, 34; w, 227, In, 232==493. Third Brigade, Brig.-Gen. William H. French: 2d Del., Lieut.-Col. William P. Baily, Capt. D. L. Stricker; 52d N. Y., Col. Paul Frank; 57th N. Y., Col. Samuel K. Zook; 64th N. Y., Col. Thomas J. Parker; 66th N. Y., Col. Joseph C. Pinckney; 53d Pa., Col. John R. Brooke. Brigade loss: k, 3; w, 43; m, 162==208. Artillery, Capt. George W. Hazzard (m w): B, 1st N. Y., Capt. Rufus D. Pettit; A and C, 4th U.
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Hanover Court House and Gaines's Mill. (search)
s were being gathered and massed for a desperate and overwhelming attack. To meet it, our front line was concentrated, reenforced, and arranged to breast the avalanche, should it come. I again asked for additional reenforcements. French's and Meagher's brigades, of Sumner's corps, were sent forward by the commanding general, but did not arrive till near dark. At 2 P. M., when I took my station beyond the Watts house, my anxieties and responsibilities had been substantially relieved, at leattack was momentarily expected, the mail arrived from the North, and the newsboys went along the line crying the New York and Philadelphia papers.--Editors. All soon rallied in rear of the Adams house behind Sykes and the brigades of French and Meagher sent to our aid, and who now, with hearty cheers, greeted our battalions as they retired and re-formed. We lost in all twenty-two cannon; some of these broke down while we were withdrawing, and some ran off the bridges at night while we were cr
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Lee's attacks north of the Chickahominy. (search)
that that reenforcements had come to cover up the Federal Charge of a sutler upon G. B. Anderson's Brigade at Gaines's Mill. retreat. They took up their position across the road and showed a determined front, but might have been broken by an artillery fire from our elevated plateau; unfortunately for us, there was no artillery to do this work. Between 9 and 10 o'clock General Lawton and myself walked out alone to examine the line of battle across the road, afterward discovered to be Meagher's Irish brigade. We got within thirty yards of the Federals, and must have been seen, but we were not fired upon, probably because we were mistaken for a party of their own men sent up to get water at McGehee's well. We met the party going back, and saw them go into their own lines. Not a word was spoken by them or by us. At such times Silence is golden. After this paper appeared in The century magazine, I received a letter from William H. Osborne, of East Bridgewater, Mass., of which
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., Rear-guard fighting during the change of base. (search)
to Savage's Station to learn something of the positions of other troops. We found no troops in the vicinity except General Meagher's brigade and the 15th Massachusetts Infantry, which had been sent to the station to destroy the stores that had to 's division was in front, Sedgwick's other two brigades being just behind. The three brigades of Richardson's division, Meagher having joined him, were farther to the rear, but more to the right. Three batteries of field-artillery, Hazzard's, Pett had withdrawn, sent Gorman's and Dana's brigades to my support in front. General Sumner formed the 88th New York, of Meagher's brigade, and the 5th New Hampshire, of Caldwell's brigade, for a charge. A mass of men came up in my rear in full yeleing watered at the swamp. The noise stampeded them, and they rushed to the rear, going through one of the regiments of Meagher's brigade, and disabling more men than were hurt in the brigade during the remainder of the day. The mules were seen no
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., McClellan's change of base and Malvern Hill. (search)
right, . . . and afterward throwing themselves upon the left of Couch's division, But, here also, after nearly reaching the Federal positions, they are repulsed. The conflict is carried on with great fierceness on both sides, and, for a moment, it seems as if the Confederates are at last about to penetrate the very center of their adversaries and of the formidable artillery, which but now was dealing destruction in their ranks. But Sumner, who commands on the right, detaches Sickles's and Meagher's brigades successively to Couch's assistance. During this time, Whiting on the left, and Huger on the right, suffer Hill's soldiers to become exhausted without supporting them. Neither Lee nor Jackson has sent the slightest order, and the din of the battle which is going on in their immediate vicinity has not sufficed to make them march against the enemy. ... At seven o'clock Hill reorganized the debris of his troops in the woods; . . . his tenacity and the courage of his soldiers have o
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.51 (search)
les City cross-roads or Glendale), June 30, 1862, showing Approximate positions of Union and Confederate troops. Also disposition of troops during the artillery engagement at White Oak Bridge. Union brigades: 1, Sickles; 2, Carr; 3, Grover; 4, Seymour; 5, Reynolds (Simmons); 6, Meade (this brigade should be represented as north of the road); 7, Robinson; 8, Birney; 9, Berry; 10, Newton; 11, Bartlett; 12,12, Taylor; 13, Burns; 11, 14, Dana; 15,15, Sully; 16, 16, Caldwell; 17, French; 18, Meagher; 19, Na glee (of Keyes's corps); 20, Davidson; 21, Brooks; 22, Hancock. Randol's battery was on the right of the road, Kerns's and Cooper's on the left, and Diederichs's and Knieriem's yet farther to the left. Thompson's battery of Kearny's division was with General Robinson's brigade (7). Confederate brigades: a, Kemper; b, Pickett (Hunton); c, R. II. Anderson (Jenkins); d, Wilcox; e, Featherston; f, Pryor; g, Branch; h, Archer; i, Field; j, J. R. Anderson; k, Pender; l, Gregg; m, n,
Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., The battle of Malvern Hill. (search)
up to Couch's aid and had suffered severely. Meagher advanced about 5 o'clock, accompanied by 32-p it. The immediate result was the sending of Meagher by Sumner and Sickles by Heintzelman. This wond time that Sumner had selected and sent me Meagher's gallant Irish brigade, and each time it rennswer to my call for aid, that Sumner sent me Meagher, and Heintzelman sent Sickles, both of whom ruccess. While riding rapidly forward to meet Meagher, who was approaching at a double-quick step, the winds, as I rode rapidly forward, leading Meagher into action. I have always regretted my act memoranda of our campaign. Advancing with Meagher's brigade, accompanied by my staff, I soon fois of the battle — just before the advance of Meagher and Sickles — the gun-boats on the James Riveouch's division and the brigades of Caldwell, Meagher, and Sickles serving with it at Malvern. [See pp. 314-318.]--F. J. P. While taking Meagher's brigade to the front, I crossed a portion of t[2 more...]<
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