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Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore) 12 0 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Rebellion Record: a Diary of American Events: Documents and Narratives, Volume 2. (ed. Frank Moore). You can also browse the collection for William O. Meagher or search for William O. Meagher in all documents.

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hem, and columns of letters from the soldiers, and pages of incidents of the battle which may be consulted by the curious; but there is a concurrence of testimony to the good conduct of Blenker's Germans, the 69th Irish, and the 79th Scotch. Capt. Meagher, indeed, I am told, yielded to the universal panic, and was seen on foot at Centreville making the best of his way towards Fort Corcoran, with exclamations which implied that for the moment he recognized the Southern Confederacy as highly belhen hundreds of men, anxious to see what is said about them in the papers, and ignorant as soldiers generally are of the incidents of the affair in which they have been engaged, read of Black horse Rangers, prodigious slaughter, Fire Zouaves, Capt. Meagher, on a white charger, with a green flag, rushing into the midst of inaccessible and impregnable masked batteries, and persuade themselves it is all true, adding to their subsequent narratives such incidents of life and color as may be within t
the newspaper statement that he was killed at the former battle, and laughingly said that he felt very warlike for a dead man, and good for at least one battle more. This brave officer was almost the first victim of the day. The cheery voice of Meagher, late the Irish, now the American patriot, rang out more heartily than ever. Then there were Corcoran, and Burnside, and Keyes, and Speidel, and many another skilled and gallant officer, all pushing forward to the first fruition of their three acks were thrown to either side, that nothing might impede their work, but we knew that no guns would slip from the hands of those determined fellows, oven if dying agonies were needed to close them with a firmer grasp. As the line swept along, Meagher galloped towards the head, crying Come on, boys! You've got your chance at last! I have not since seen him, but hear that he fought magnificently, and is wounded. Tyler's forces thus moved forward for half a mile, describing quite one-fourt
Doc. 33.-Thirty-Seventh regiment N. Y. S. V. The following is a list of the officers:-- field-officers.--Colonel, John H. McCunn; Lieutenant-Colonel, John Burke; Major, D. C. Minton; Adjutant, C. Murphy. staff officers.--Doctors, John McNulty and William O. Meagher; Lieutenant, George W. Clarke; Colonel's Aide-de Camp and Quartermaster, Hoyt; Chaplain, Rev. J. Tissott. Co. A--Captain, Gilbert Riordan; First Lieutenant, Philip Doherty; Ensign, Andrew J. Dregnan. Co. B--Captain, James T. Maguire; First Lieutenant, David Ren; Ensign, Robert Johnstone Bassett. Co. C--Captain, Michael Doran; First Lieutenant, Martin E. Lawlor; Ensign, Josiah W. Willett. Co. D-Captain, F. McHugh; First Lieutenant, Jas. D. Clark; Ensign, P. H. Hayes. Co. E--Captain, John Kavanagh; First Lieutenant, J. McCorman; Ensign, James P. Boyle. Co. F-Captain, Dominick O'Connor; First Lieutenant,----Long; Ensign,----Vosburg. Co. G-Captain, Michael Murphy; First Lieutenant, Richard S. Barry; Ensign, James
an live within ourselves, and it shall be prohibited to send them abroad. Let them try that, and if England breaks the blockade for cotton, rice, and tobacco, make her say Please, sir, under the guns of our forts before she shall have a pound of any thing. Among all the extraordinary events of the last few months, the most surprising, the most marvellous, and the most fearful, is the palpable revelation that the people of the free States, high and low, from Everett and Cushing to the lowest Zouave, including Meagher, were fully ripe for a military despotism. They have accepted it without a moment's hesitation, given their Constitution to the winds, rushed into its embrace, and surrendered themselves without a murmur and without reserve, to the power of a man who is known to have no experience in arms or government, and who has shown himself to be a blackguard, a liar, and a coward. Such stupidity and baseness are without parallel in human history.--Charleston Courier, June 21.