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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones) 5 1 Browse Search
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Browsing named entities in Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones). You can also browse the collection for Robt S. Means or search for Robt S. Means in all documents.

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Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Gregg's brigade of South Carolinians in the Second. Battle of Manassas. (search)
heavier. At the head of the Seventeenth regiment fell one who had been an honored governor of the State, whose advanced years did not warrant his service in the field, but whose devotion to the State revived the energy of his youth, and with Governor Means fell also his son, Major Robt S. Means. Colonel J. M. Gadberry, of the Eighteenth Regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel T. C. Watkins, of the Twenty-third Regiment, also died upon the fatal, if glorious, field for our State. Just in front of thMajor Robt S. Means. Colonel J. M. Gadberry, of the Eighteenth Regiment, and Lieutenant-Colonel T. C. Watkins, of the Twenty-third Regiment, also died upon the fatal, if glorious, field for our State. Just in front of the deepest part of the railroad cut, where the knoll is highest, a rough hewn stone monument tells where the brave Federal soldiers fell within a few feet of the coveted goal. The crumbling bank and the filling cut are fast effacing the last traces of the spot where her soldiers fought so desperately for the honor of South Carolina.
Southern Historical Society Papers, Volume 13. (ed. Reverend J. William Jones), Reunion of the Virginia division Army of Northern Virginia Association. (search)
rs are to hold your position at all hazards. Then he turned off into the woods before the blue-coats recovered their surprise sufficiently to give a harmless volley after him. I may not have right the name of the Federal regiment, but by inquiry I found out that of the courier; for, modest as brave, he had not boasted of his adventure. He was Hector Bowden, of Loudoun county, Virginia. Poor fellow! his was a sad fate, for on a secret visit to his parents, he was murdered by the Tories of Means's gang. One other incident of the same kind. After the defeat of Porter at Cold Harbor, and while his men were huddled together in a confused mass in the woods after dark, they were told to encourage them, that Richmond had been captured and forthwith began to cheer vociferously. One of my couriers thinking that cheering could only come from victors, rode in among them and was greeted with the question: Have we got Richmond? Yes; answered he, we have got Richmond, and escaped under cov