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Robert Underwood Johnson, Clarence Clough Buell, Battles and Leaders of the Civil War: Volume 2., chapter 7.42 (search)
w, 637; m, 15 == 844. Fourth Brigade, Col. Alfred H. Colquitt: 13th Ala., Col. Birkett D. Fry; 6th Ga., Lieut.-Col. J. M. Newton; 23d Ga., Col. Emory F. Best; 27th Ga., Col. Levi B. Smith; 28th Ga., Col. T. J. Warthen. Brigade loss: k, 75; w, 474; in, 5 == 554. Fifth Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Roswell S. Ripley: 44th Ga., Col. Robert A. Smith (m w), Capt. John W. Beck; 48th Ga., Col. William Gibson; 1st N. C., Col. M. S. Stokes (k), Capt. H. A. Brown, Lieut.-Col. William P. Bynum; 3d N. C., Col. Gaston Meares (k), Lieut.-Col. William L. De Rosset. Brigade loss: k, 171; w, 707; m, 30==908. Artillery: Va. Battery (Hanover Arty.), Capt. (G. W. Nelson. (See, also, Jones's Battalion in Reserve Artillery, temporarily attached to this division.) Magruder's command, Maj.-Gen. J. B. Magruder. Jones's division, Brig.-Gen. David R. Jones. Staff loss: w, 1. First Brigade, Brig.-Gen. Robert Toombs: 2d Ga., Col. Edgar M. Butt (w), Lieut.-Col. William R. Holmes; 15th Ga., Col. William M. Mcint
ina, Colonel Iverson, the Third North Carolina, Colonel Meares, and the First North Carolina, commanded by Capkes and Major Skinner, First North Carolina; Colonel Gaston Meares, Third North Carolina; Colonel Warthem, TwenColonel Gibson, and third North Carolina, under Colonel Meares, moved to a position in front of the enemy on the battalion of the Third North Carolina, under Colonel Meares, and of the First North Carolina, under Captaints support, the gallant and the accomplished Colonel Gaston Meares, of the Third North Carolina regiment, fell.l M. S. Stokes, of the First North Carolina; Colonel Gaston Meares, of the Third North Carolina, and Colonel Rorst North Carolina volunteers, on the right; Colonel Gaston Meares, Third North Carolina volunteers, in the cening one Captain and two privates of the enemy. Colonel Meares advanced in the centre, to the battle-ground oft which are not, as yet, armed with artillery. Colonel Meares was reinforced by Colonel Gibson's regiment dur
uished bravery. In the Twenty-seventh, every commissioned officer, except one, was killed or wounded at Sharpsburg; and this sole survivor was unwilling to discriminate among so many brave men. Brigadier-General Doles (now commanding Ripley's brigade) pays a tribute to the memory of Major Robert S. Smith, Fourth Georgia, and speaks in the most complimentary terms of Colonel De Rosset, and Major Thurston, Third North Carolina, (the former severely, and the latter slightly, wounded,) and Captains Meares, McNair, and Williams, of the same regiment. Lieutenant-Colonel H. A. Brown, and Captain J. A. Hannell, acting Major of the First North Carolina regiment, are also highly commended. Lieutenant-Colonel Phil Cook, Captains Willis, De Graffenreid, and Lieutenants Hawkens, Bisel, Hulbert, Gay, (wounded,) Stephens, Exell, Snead, Cobb, (killed,) Macon, (severely wounded,) all commended themselves to my special notice by their gallant and meritorious conduct. Captain Rey, commanding Forty-f
-armed veteran of the Mexican war, a rigid disciplinarian, thoroughly trained in office work, and not only systematic but original in his plans. The State has never fully appreciated, perhaps never known, the importance of the work done for it by this undemonstrative, thoroughly efficient officer. Under Martin's supervision the ten regiments of State troops and all subsequent regiments were organized. The first six regiments, commanded respectively by Cols. M. S. Stokes, C. C. Tew, Gaston Meares, George B. Anderson, D. K. McRae, and Charles F. Fisher, were in a short while transferred to the Confederacy and ordered to Virginia, three of them arriving there in time to be present at the first battle of Manassas. The Seventh, Col. R. P. Campbell, was, after some delay, sent to New Bern; and the Eighth, on its completion, went to garrison Roanoke island. The Ninth was a cavalry regiment formed by Col. Robert Ransom. There were many exasperating delays in getting this regiment equ
e wound in the leg. Pender's Report. Ripley's arrival brought two more North Carolina regiments into the battle—the First, Colonel Stokes, and the Third, Colonel Meares. These, with the Forty-fourth and Forty-eighth Georgia, formed Ripley's brigade. Two of Ripley's regiments, the First North Carolina and the Forty-fourth Gee Thirtieth, Colonel Parker. In Ripley's were the First and Third North Carolina, the First under Lieut.-Col. W. P. Bynum, of the Second, and the Third under Colonel Meares. As Hill's men moved in, Magruder also ordered an advance of his troops, but they were delayed and did not get into close action until Hill's division had beorth Carolina losses in these seven days were: killed, 650; wounded, 3,279. Conspicuous among the slain were the following field officers: Cols. M. S. Stokes, Gaston Meares, R. P. Campbell, C. C. Lee; Lieut.-Cols. Petway and F. J. Faison; Majs. T. N. Crumpler, T. L. Skinner, B. R. Huske. These were among the State's most gifted a
North Carolina State troops. --The commanding officers of the 4th Regiment of North Carolina, whose arrival we have already noted, are Col. Geo. B. Anderson; Lieut. Col., John A. Young; Major, Wm. Grimes; Adjutant, J. D. Hyam. The Regiment is composed of infantry, artillery and riflemen, and is about 1,100 strong. The balance of the 3rd Regiment of State troops (three companies of which arrived several days ago and three arrived yesterday) are expected in a few days' time under Major De Rosset. The commanding officers of the 3rd Regiment are Gaston Meares, Colonel; Robert Cowin, Lieut. Colonel; Wm. De Russet, Major; John B. Van Bucklin, Adjutant. The Regiment numbers, all told, 1,200 men.
Arrived. --Four or more companies of Col. Gaston Meares' Third Regiment North Carolina State troops, under the command of Maj Wm. De Resset, arrived in Richmond yesterday. No one need wish to see more soldierly looking men, or men better armed or more determined. The old North State is a trump.--Much of the proficiency of the men in drill, &c., is due to the assiduous endeavors of Lieut. Thos. O. Jenes, who has spared no pains to perfect his comrades in all that pertains to the soldier's art. The Third are encamped a short distance from this city for the present.
Gone away. --The Third Regiment of North Carolina State troops, Col. Gaston Meares commanding, left this city yesterday for a post of duty and danger.
udience in Lynchburg last Friday night, on the Battle of Manassas. John C. Rahming, lately arrested in New York for "treason," was a merchant, doing business at 36 South street. The employees in the Gosport Navy Yard were paid off, for a full month, in Confederate notes, on Friday last. Gaston Meares, Jr., son of Colonel Gaston Meares, was drowned at Wilmington, N. C., last Friday. The prize steamer St. Nicholas was sold at Fredericksburg, on Tuesday last, for $12,000 cash. dience in Lynchburg last Friday night, on the Battle of Manassas. John C. Rahming, lately arrested in New York for "treason," was a merchant, doing business at 36 South street. The employees in the Gosport Navy Yard were paid off, for a full month, in Confederate notes, on Friday last. Gaston Meares, Jr., son of Colonel Gaston Meares, was drowned at Wilmington, N. C., last Friday. The prize steamer St. Nicholas was sold at Fredericksburg, on Tuesday last, for $12,000 cash.