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Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 10: naval engagement at South-West pass.--the Gulf blockading squadron in November, 1861. (search)
ers, Lieut. D. D. Porter, U. S. N., and Captain M. C. Meigs, U. S. Engineers, presented themselves may desire. Abraham Lincoln. A true copy. M. C. Meigs, Chief Engineer of the expedition. Simie to make the expedition a success. Then Capt. Meigs and Lieut. Porter called on Gen. Scott, ande better to conceal the intended movement. Capt. Meigs also urged Foote to obey the President's orrt McRea, with his crew at their guns, when Capt. Meigs in a large Government vessel laid right in ed to communicate. The ship was stopped and Capt Meigs came on board, handing to Lieut. Porter a pred it would draw their fire upon the fort! Capt. Meigs had obtained, before he left Washington, aurter had discussed Col. Brown's protest with Capt Meigs, and carefully considered the matter, he rel obeyed, the steamer Atlantic, chartered by Capt. Meigs, arrived and threw 600 men into the fort, w the Navy Department, are null and void. Capt. Meigs puts the matter truthfully and squarely, wh[1 more...]
Admiral David D. Porter, The Naval History of the Civil War., Chapter 13: building a navy on the Western rivers.--battle of Belmont. (search)
nt, as it was supposed the armed vessels would be a mere appendage of the land forces; and there does not seem to have been a man in the Cabinet at that time who knew the difference between a gun-boat and a transport. In July, 1861, Quartermaster General Meigs contracted with Mr. Eads to build a number of iron-clad gun-boats for the Western waters, and from the fact that Gen. Meigs contracted for them it is presumed the War Department paid for them, and that the Navy Department had not then Gen. Meigs contracted for them it is presumed the War Department paid for them, and that the Navy Department had not then risen to the height of the occasion. Seven of these gun-boats were each to be about 600 tons, to draw six feet of water, to be plated with two and a half inch iron, and steam nine knots. They were to be each 175 feet long and 51 1/2 wide, their sides at an angle of 35 degrees from the water line, their gun decks being but a foot above the surface of the water. The bow and stern were at an angle of 45 degrees, and the wheel for propelling the vessels was placed in the stern. Of course these v